General Government Major Revenues

Fiscal Year 2022 Operating and Capital Budget

General Governmental Revenues

General governmental revenues are primarily derived from property taxes. Departments supported by property tax revenues provide a wide range of services including public safety, parks and recreation, purchasing, and human resources.


General government revenues are comprised of the following major revenue streams:

  • Property Taxes
  • Charges for Services
  • Electric Franchise Fees
  • Half-Cent Sales Taxes
  • Occupational Licenses Taxes/Local Business Taxes
  • Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT)/Payment in Lieu of Franchise Fees (PILOF)
  • State Revenue Sharing

Property Tax Revenues

Legal Authorization: Authorized by Florida Constitution and Florida Statutes, Title XIV, Chapters 192-197 and 200, Florida Statutes.


Source: Taxes levied against the assessed taxable value of property within the City limits.


Uses and restrictions: Uses are generally restricted to purposes for which they were authorized, such as funding public safety, parks, and various other general governmental purposes.


Analysis/Assumptions: Property taxes represent the City’s single largest revenue source and are based on the City’s millage rate (6.2076) and the taxable value of the City’s real property. The Hillsborough County Property Appraiser is responsible for determining and notifying the City of its taxable value by July 1 each year. FY2022 is the ninth consecutive year with a projected increase in the City’s taxable value since the economic recession. FY2022 property tax revenues are expected to increase $28.5 million compared to the FY2021 budget due to an increase of 7.9% in the City’s taxable value.


After over 30 years without a millage rate increase, the City adopted a millage rate of 6.2076 mills for FY2018, an increase of 0.475 mills over the previous rate of 5.7326 mills. Since FY2018, the City's millage rate has remained at 6.2076 mills.

Charges for Services

Legal Authorization: Authorized by City of Tampa Code of Ordinances, Chapter 24, Article I, Section 24-8.


Source: Revenues received from charges for consumption of services and products.


Uses and restrictions: Charges for Services are used to offset the cost of providing said services.


Analysis/Assumptions: The City charges for certain governmental services including fire inspections, police services for special events, parks and recreation programs and camps, and event rentals at the Tampa Convention Center. Charges for Services are projected to return to pre-COVID-19 levels in FY2022 as event rentals at the Tampa Convention Center are projected to increase.

Electric Franchise Fees

Legal Authorization: Authorized by City of Tampa Code of Ordinances Chapter 22, Article I, Division 1, Section 22-4.


Source: Fees received from a corporation or an entity that maintains facilities in the City’s rights-of-way for delivery of its services. Franchise fees are generally calculated as a percent of gross revenues. After maintaining a level franchise fee rate for over 25 years, in FY2012 the City increased the electric franchise fee rate from 4.6% to 6.0% of gross revenues from the sale of electric energy to its customers within the City limits.


Uses and restrictions: Electric Franchise Fees are used to offset the expenses associated with regulation of the rights-of-way and to provide a fair compensation for the rental value of the rights-of-way. Revenues are available for any general governmental purpose.


Analysis/Assumptions: Electric Franchise Fees are projected to increase by 7.6% in FY2022 compared to the FY2021 budget, however, the FY2022 budget is consistent with pre-COVID-19 historical trends.

Half-Cent Sales Tax Revenue

Legal Authorization: Authorized by Sections 202.18(2)(c), 212.20(6), and 218.60-.67, Florida Statutes.


Source: Half-Cent Sales Taxes are collected by the state and distributed to local governments based on a state distribution formula.


Uses and restrictions: Revenues are available for any general governmental purpose.


Analysis/Assumptions: Half-Cent Sales Tax revenues have increased since FY2016 as the economy continues to recover from the economic downturn. For FY2022, Half-Cent Sales Tax revenues are anticipated to increase 15% compared to the FY2021 budget. This increase is partially attributable to implementation of an internet sales tax that started on July 1, 2021, stronger consumer confidence, and increased consumer spending.

Occupational Licenses Tax/Local Business Tax Revenues

Legal Authorization: Authorized by Sections 205.042 and 205.0535, Florida Statutes.


Source: Occupational Licenses Tax/Local Business Tax revenues are paid by individuals or businesses for the right to engage in certain trades, professions, and occupations within City limits.


Uses and restrictions: Revenues are available for any general governmental purpose.


Analysis/Assumption: FY2022 revenues are expected to remain consistent with FY2021 projections.

PILOT-PILOF Revenues

Legal Authorization: Authorized pursuant to City of Tampa policy.


Source: Payment In Lieu of Taxes/Payment In Lieu of Franchise Fees (PILOT/PILOF) are assessed on the Parking Division and the Solid Waste, Wastewater, and Water departments. PILOT is calculated based on the value of the assets for the respective enterprise department/division times the City’s current year millage rate. PILOF is calculated based on annual revenues collected by the respective enterprise department/division times the currently authorized franchise fee rate.


Uses and restrictions: Revenues are available for any general governmental purpose.


Analysis/Assumptions: PILOT revenues increase primarily due to the increase in Water and Wastewater capital programs. PILOF revenues increase a result of increases in potable water sales, wastewater disposal, and water and wastewater monthly base rate charges. The City anticipates an accumulative increase of $2.1 million in PILOT/PILOF FY2022 revenues over the FY2021 budget.

State Revenue Sharing

Legal Authorization: Authorized by Sections 206.605(1), 206.997, 212.20(6), and 218.20-.26, Florida Statutes.


Source: The State Revenue Sharing Act of 1972 established trust funds from certain state-levied tax monies (i.e. fuel taxes, cigarette taxes, and state component of Communication Services Tax) to be shared with counties and municipalities. The state formula for distribution is based upon population, sales tax collections, and local ability to raise revenue.


Uses and restrictions: According to the Florida Legislature’s Office of Economic and Demographic Research 2018 Local Government Financial Handbook (September 2018) municipalities were to assume that 23.06% of these funds must be used for transportation-related purposes with the balance available for any general governmental purpose. As a matter of policy, the City assigns not less than 28% for transportation-related purposes.


Analysis/Assumptions: State Revenue Sharing revenues in FY2022 are projected to increase slightly, by 3.6%, compared to the FY2021 budget. This increase is partially attributable to the implementation of an internet sales tax that started on July 1, 2021 and increased consumer spending.