Stormwater

Fiscal Year 2022 Operating and Capital Budget

An image depicting work being done on the Cypress Street Outfall Project located at North Rome Avenue and West Gray Street.

Department Name: Stormwater Division

Department Website: https://www.tampa.gov/tss-stormwater


Vision and Mission:

Our vision is to deliver the highest quality stormwater services to enhance the safety and quality of life within our community. Our mission is to provide enhanced water quality and flooding relief within the City of Tampa by optimizing resources, implementing best practices, and leveraging innovative technologies.


Goals and Objectives:

• Strive to attain the optimum level of service for stormwater management;

• Continue to implement projects that promote stormwater needs with neighborhood desires; and

• Continue to improve management and maintenance of the stormwater infrastructure.


Current Operations and Initiatives:

• Implement a capital improvement program that will provide incremental improvement to the overall stormwater system;

• Execute strategic operations leveraging the Stormwater Assessment Fee and ensuring National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit compliance including Green Infrastructure; and

• Continue to optimize our customer service center to improve responsiveness



An image depicting work being done on the 43rd Street Outfall Project.

Performance Metrics

Below are the performance metrics for the Stormwater Division.


To see the full performance metrics for the Mobility Department please go to: https://stories.opengov.com/tampa/published/-smzFta6x



Pipes Maintained & Inspected


There are approximately 575 miles of stormwater piping within the City. The performance target for inspection and cleaning is 75 miles per year (6.25 miles per month). Debris, sediment, and vegetation are removed and transported to a processing facility. Additionally, the culvert type, size, location and its condition are documented. This work is done to reduce flooding and identify necessary repair and restoration projects.

Stormwater Cave-in Repairs


Stormwater cave-ins occur regularly throughout the City and are typically more prevalent in the wetter months. A cave-in is a depression in the right-of-way that is caused by a failing utility. Each utility department (Water, Wastewater, and Stormwater) encounters cave-ins and repairs them according to severity and urgency. On an average, Stormwater Operations repairs 150 to 175 cave-ins per year which equates to 2 to 4 cave-ins per week. All stormwater cave-ins are repaired by City in-house resources.

Ditch Miles Maintained & Inspected


There are approximately 188 miles of stormwater ditch systems within the City. The performance target for inspection and maintenance is 26.9 miles per year (2.4 miles per month). Debris, sediment, and vegetation are removed and transported to a facility for processing. Ditches that need maintenance are graded by in-house resources and contractors. Ditches are cleaned, graded and sodded to reduce flooding and enhance water quality.

Stormwater Inlets Inspected by Month


There are 26,857 Inlet structures within the City. The performance target for inspection and cleaning is 3,840 per year (320 per month). Debris, sediment, and vegetation are removed and transported to a facility for processing. Additionally, the structure type, size, location and its condition are documented to determine necessary repair and restoration projects. This work is conducted primarily by in-house resources and is done to reduce flooding and enhance water quality.

Average Number of Days to Mow & Spray Lots, Ponds


The City currently maintains 144 ponds, 85 miles of ditches and 27 vacant lots reserved for future ponds. To keep storm water ponds and ditches functioning properly they require monthly maintenance. The maintenance includes grass-cutting, pond spraying of invasive vegetation, Fence repairs, sediment dredging, removal of illegal dumping and trash pickup. Stormwater ponds and ditches are designed to collect rainwater from impermeable surfaces such as parking lots, roads and buildings. Rainwater is absorbed into the soil helping prevent flooding and improve the water quality in the aquifer, river and bay. Maintenance is a key part needed to help keep the city above water.

Street Sweep Days Ahead/Behind Cycle


Clean streets beautify neighborhoods but are only part of the reason why street sweeping is a valued service in the City of Tampa. Protecting water resources is another important reason to maintain clean streets. Rainwater flows from rooftops, yards and streets to storm drains, and to our creeks, canals, and rivers to Tampa Bay. Street sweeping captures litter, sediment, and fallen leaves before it enters the storm drains protecting our waterways from these pollutants.

Operating Budget Analysis

Revenues increase from Revised FY2021 due to a projected increase in Stormwater Service Assessments and Stormwater Service Fees.


Personnel Expenses increase from Revised FY2021 is due to increases in salaries, pension contributions, and healthcare costs.

Operating Budget

An image depicting a South Fielding Avenue ditch before rehabilitation.
An image depicting a South Fielding Avenue ditch after rehabilitation.

Capital Project Details

For FY2022, the Stormwater capital improvement program (CIP) totals $36.0 million. It is funded by authorized stormwater non-ad valorem assessment revenues, bond proceeds, and anticipated grant funds. This funding will provide for flood and drainage relief in addition to green infrastructures along the project routes.


Large projects such as Cypress Street Outfall Regional Stormwater Improvements Project construction is well under way. The Lower Peninsula Flooding Relief - Southeast Region Project is also under way. The Southeast Seminole Heights Flooding Relief Project will be fully funded in FY2022 along with North Tampa Closed Basin Flooding Relief. Water quality improvement projects such as pond improvements in the North Tampa Closed Basin area, and in the Lower Peninsula area are part of our continuing effort for compliance with the City Total Maximum Daily Load National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System requirements, and the Mayor’s strategic goal of establishing environmental sustainability and resilience.


Neighborhood stormwater improvements will occur with the Comprehensive Infrastructure for Tampa’s Neighborhoods – Design-Build Project. As well as Lamb Canal Rehabilitation, Manhattan: Vasconia to Obispo Flooding Relief, and the Clark and 30th Street Pipe Relocation Project. The FY2022 CIP budget also includes various stormwater improvement projects citywide including box culvert and ditch rehabilitations, pipeline replacement, and cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) rehabilitations.


The Capital Improvement Program Budget does not include cost allocation.


For a PDF Collection of Project Detail pages, click here.


Note: "To Date" Budget and Actual Balances on PDF pages are as of preparation of the budget and may not match the "To Date" balances on department pages.

An image depicting work being done on the 43rd Street Outfall Project.

Capital Improvement Program Budget

An image depicting work being done on an outfall for the Upper Peninsula Watershed Drainage Improvements Project.
An image depicting work being done on a box culvert for the Upper Peninsula Watershed Drainage Improvements Project.

Total Budget*

*Total budget might vary from the sum of operating and capital budgets by funds appropriated under other departments.

An image depicting work being done on the Copeland Park Forcemain at 111th Avenue and 26th Street.
An image depicting work being done on the Copeland Park Forcemain at 111th Avenue and 26th Street.
An image depicting backfill being done on the Copeland Park Forcemain at 111th Avenue and 26th Street.

Budgeted Position Counts

Stormwater Division in Action

Watch this short video for a more detailed look into the City of Tampa Stormwater Division.


If you have any additional questions or would like to see more please visit https://www.tampa.gov/tss-stormwater.