Police Commission

Who we are and what we do

Business Goals

Become the “go-to” place for Oaklanders to file police misconduct complaints and provide input about police policies and practices;

Operate as independent/impartial bodies;

Conduct community outreach and develop strategic partnerships;

Review and improve Oakland Police Department (OPD), Community Police Review Agency, and Office of the Inspector General policies, procedures, and practices;

Set final discipline for the City of Oakland in police discipline cases; and

Ensure transparency, accountability, and best practices for policing in Oakland.

BUREAUS/DIVISIONS

Police Commission

The Police Commission is an independent seven-member board of Oakland residents, three appointed by the Mayor and four by an independent citizen selection panel. The Police Commission holds regular public sessions and reviews allegations of misconduct committed by sworn members of OPD. It also reviews OPD policies, procedures, customs, and General Orders, especially those governing the use of force, profiling based on any of the protected characteristics identified by federal, state, or local law, or First Amendment assemblies, or which contain elements expressly listed in federal court orders or federal court settlements. The Police Commission also oversees the CPRA and OIG. Finally, the Commission is the final voice in setting discipline in police officer misconduct cases for the City of Oakland; officers have a right of appeal from those decisions, as do all public employees.

Community Police Review Agency

The Community Police Review Agency's (CPRA) primary responsibilities are to receive and review all public complaints concerning the alleged misconduct or failure to act of all OPD sworn employees, including complaints from OPD’s non-sworn employees. The CPRA’s duties include investigating public complaints involving uses of force, in-custody deaths, profiling based on any of the protected characteristics identified by federal, state, or local law, and First Amendment assemblies, and any other possible misconduct or failure to act of an OPD sworn employee, as directed by the Police Commission or as staffing levels permit. The CPRA recommends discipline in sustained cases.

Office of the Inspector General

The civilian Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is designed to monitor and audit the activities of OPD, including conducting any audit or review of OPD necessary to assess OPD’s policies, procedures, and performance for adherence to constitutional policing practices, including any pattern of noncompliance; to monitor OPD’s compliance with the fifty-two (52) tasks described in the long-standing Negotiated Settlement Agreement, even after the Agreement expires; and to periodically audit the CPRA’s performance.

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

SERVICE INVENTORY

External Services

Investigation of Community Complaints of Police Misconduct

Receiving and investigating community complaints of misconduct by sworn members of the Oakland Police Department (~500 complaints/year).


Public Engagement Regarding Police Oversight and Reform

Community outreach and public engagement with Police Policy and Practice.



Internal Services

Investigation of Community Complaints of Police Misconduct

Receiving and investigating community complaints of misconduct by sworn members of the Oakland Police Department (~500 complaints/year).


Budget Control & Analysis

Performing internal functions to ensure that City operations align with the Adopted Budget and analyze items for their current or future impacts on City Budget.


Police Performance Audits and Policy Drafting and Research

Analysis and investigation of OPD Policy and Practice, and examination of potential issues and deficiencies in the same as directed by the Oakland Police Commission.


Departmental Financial & Personnel Managment

Managing the internal budgetary, procurement, accounting, hiring, and payroll function of a City Department to ensure the Department can perform its core functions.

POLICE COMMISSION FACTS

On November 8, 2016, Oakland voters approved Measure LL with 83.19% (137,032 votes) in favor of the measure. Measure LL established: (1) A Police Commission to oversee OPD policies and procedures, and (2) The CPRA to investigate police misconduct and recommend discipline. On June 22, 2018, the Oakland City Council approved an ordinance to support and implement Measure LL. The first slate of Commissioners were seated in December 2017. The Police Commission is in its fourth year of oversight.


On November 3, 2020, Oakland voters approved Measure S1 with 81.27% in favor. Measure S1 expanded the independence, authority, and staffing of the Police Commission and CPRA, and provided that the OIG reports to the Police Commission.


Since its inception, the CPRA has received approximately 500 public complaints annually regarding alleged police misconduct.