Health Department

2023 Mayor's Recommended change items

Full details on department programs, expenses, and revenues, are available at the main department page.

Health Department - Abortion Access

Program: Youth Development and Sexual Health

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 0

The Mayor recommends $300,000 be set aside for a one-time fund to support abortion access within Minneapolis. This is an emerging need, and Health will continue to work with the City Attorney's Office and Finance to refine this proposal and ensure that funds support the public health of City residents.

Health Department - Sustaining School Based Clinics

Program: School Based Clinics

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 4

Proposal detail and background

The Mayor recommends one-time funding of $223,00 and ongoing funding of $443,000 for the School Basic Clinics program to sustain four FTEs that are currently grant-funded. This recommendation will cover personnel expenses for one nurse practitioner, one medical assistant, one mental health counselor, and one health educator, beginning in June 2023.


Description of the change

SBCs provide physical and mental health services within an integrated school-based primary care model and promote healthy lifestyles assuring long-term well-being for adolescents and improved educational outcomes. SBCs directly impact the City's goals for keeping youth in school, involved, and connected, eradicating teen pregnancy, and increasing high school graduation rates. These goals are accomplished in part by SBCs to improve teen health, wellness, prevention, and treatment. 


More medical and mental health services are needed because of the pandemic, George Floyd’s murder and subsequent civil unrest, and students transitioning back to in-person learning. These unprecedented impacts have resulted in over 70% fewer well child visits, immunizations, and sexually transmitted infections (STI) testing, which puts teens at higher health risks.


In 2021, SBC services expanded and added a new location targeting new immigrants through a Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) grant ending June 2023. This requested funding will continue these services and result in 600 more teens served annually, by staff who mostly reflect the racial makeup of the students served. Adolescent clients will receive from 2 to 30 visits resulting in over 3000 visits annually. It will provide a stable base to seek other grant funding and increase 3rd party insurance reimbursement capacity.


Equity impacts and results

This recommendation will reduce racial disparities and is supported by rigorous, data-driven evidence.


SBC activities take place among students who attend eight high schools – Edison, Henry, FAIR- Wellstone, Roosevelt, South, Washburn, Southwest, and Longfellow Alternative High School, which specifically serves pregnant and parenting teens. These schools are racially and ethnically diverse and representative of the Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) as a whole. In 2021, MPS students were 39% White, 31% Black or African American, 19% Hispanic or Latino American, 5% Asian American, 3% Two or more races, and 3% American Indian or Alaska Native.


All SBC services are focused on improving health equity and providers often reflect the race/culture of the students served. For instance, SBCs provide reproductive health care including STI education and treatment. Services are designed to reduce significant disparities in health outcomes in rates of STIs among BIPOC communities when compared to white communities. For example, the 2018 chlamydia rate for Black young adults ages 18-24 was 7.7 times higher (9,432 per 100,000), the American Indian rate was 5.5 times higher (6,670 per 100,000) and the Hispanic/Latino rate was 1.8 times higher (2,266 per 100,000) than the white rate (1,221 per 100,000).


SBCs share outcomes with members of our Teen Health Empowerment Council and get their input and insights on what works as well as what can be changed or improved.


Goal: MPS High School students are engaged in their well-being and have support and skill building opportunities for proactive, healthy decision making.  


Objective:

  • Reproductive Health – Decreased STIs and increased screening rates.  
  • Mental Health – Mental health needs are identified and addressed, resulting in improved overall well-being.  
  • Reach – High school students are aware of clinic-based services and feel comfortable making use of them.  

Metrics:

  • 80% of sexually active students screened for STIs. 
  • 5-10% or lower positive chlamydia/GC rates; 95% resolved infections 
  • 75% of clients will have mental health screening; 80% of positive screens enrolled, referred, and receive follow up.  
  • 60% of student body will receive SBC services.  

Health Department - Green Cost Share

Program: Environmental Services

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 0

Proposal detail and background

The Mayor recommends one-time funding of $416,000 in 2023 and $155,000 in 2024 for Green Cost Share.


Description of the change

This funding will increase the reach of the Green Cost Share program. This program is key to the City’s climate goals and has consistently higher demand than available funding. With these dollars, the City helps businesses reduced the disproportionate impacts of climate change and environmental pollution.


Green Cost Share projects incentivizes participants to engage in solar energy projects, weatherization, and pollution reduction by providing upfront, matching funds. Over half of the projects completed in 2021, or 73% of the funding, were considered environmental justice projects. 1,700 low-income properties took part with solar and energy efficiency projects.


As an existing, successful program, additional funds can be easily deployed to increase the number of projects completed annually.


Equity impacts and results

This recommendation will reduce racial disparities and is supported by rigorous, data-driven evidence.


Low-income residents, Indigenous people, and residents of color within the City are disproportionately impacted by the cumulative effects of traffic, air pollution, blight, and climate change. Fair treatment means no group of people should bear a disproportionate share of the negative environmental consequences resulting from industrial, governmental, and commercial operations or the execution of federal, state, local, and tribal programs and policies.


The Green Cost Share program is one way that Minneapolis strives for environmental justice. In 2021 there were a record 173 out of 334 projects Environmental Justice qualified projects. The program focuses its work in areas of the City that are designated are Green Zones, Great Streets, low-income/affordable housing, and priority census tracts. A higher percentage of matches and higher caps on project matches in high percentage BIPOC communities are one strategy to ensure that those most impacted by pollution and negative effects of climate change are prioritized.


Goal: To drive pollution reduction and climate action through win-win approaches with small businesses, non-profits and community groups through financial matches to investment that benefits the health of residents, workers, and visitors.  


Objective: To maintain a high level (250-300 projects) of Green Cost Share projects each year in energy efficiency, solar and innovative pollution reduction to drive towards our citywide climate action goals and reduce criteria pollution.


Metric:

  • Track pollution reduction in C02 equivalents and lbs of criteria pollution reduced
  • Invest at least 40% of funding into Environmental Justice and low-income properties to meet White House Justice 40 standards.

Health Department - Opioid Treatment

Program: Office of Opioid Prevention

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 0

Proposal detail and background

The Mayor recommends $645,000 in ongoing spending for evidence-based treatment for Opioid addiction.


Description of the change

In August 2021, the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office joined a $26 billion settlement agreement with pharmaceutical distributors and opioid manufacturers. States, counties, and cities will receive settlement dollars. Funds are intended to aid jurisdictions in fighting the opioid epidemic. Minneapolis will receive a total of $10.8 million over the course of 18 years. By the end of 2023, the City expects to have received $1.2 million from this settlement. $645,000 is the planned payment in 2023. Funds received in both 2022 and 2023 may be available to support opioid addiction treatment in 2023.


The Mayor recommends that the City move quickly in 2023 to deploy funds in support of evidence-based treatment for opioid addiction. In 2023 and 2024, the Minneapolis Health Department will conduct a thorough engagement process on the City’s strategy for the remainder of these funds. Engaging with experts, partner organizations, and Minneapolis residents, will better inform the City as to the most effective use of dollars.


Equity impacts and results

This recommendation will reduce racial disparities and is supported by rigorous, data-driven evidence.


American Indian people are seven times as likely to die from a drug overdose as white people, per the Minnesota Department of Health. Black people are two times as likely to die from drug overdose as white people.


The Opioid epidemic disproportionately impacts Minneapolis relative to the state of Minnesota. In 2018, of the 343 opioid-related overdose deaths in the state, 60 occurred in Minneapolis. Analysis by Hennepin County indicates that while American Indians make up only 0.6% of the population, they account for 10.1% of opioid-involved deaths. Non-fatal opioid-involved overdoses have increased since 2016, with people ages 15-34 most frequently presenting at the ER for overdoses and the mortality rate for opioid-related drug overdoses more than doubled. The impact has been especially felt within the American Indian and Black communities, where the opioid death rates are twelve and two times that of white residents, respectively.


Goal: Reducing the number of overdose-related deaths and emergency room admissions while increasing the access and amount of treatment resources, services and supports.


Objective:

  • Increased access to preventative services such as naloxone and peer support.
  • Increased access to support services for individuals with opioid use disorder.
  • Increased access to Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT), treatment, and culturally sensitive facilities.

Metric:

  • Decrease in the number of overdose-related deaths.
  • Decrease in the number of overdose-related emergency department admissions.
  • Increase in the number of treatment facilities.
  • Increase in the number of people enrolled and receiving MAT and treatment.
  • Increase in number of facilities and people receiving culturally sensitive services.

Health Department - Tree Program Coordinator

Program: Environmental Services

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 1

Proposal detail and background

The Mayor recommends $134,000 in ongoing funding for a Tree Program Coordinator for the existing City Trees Program. This FTE would create and implement a citywide campaign to planting trees on private property. This person would work in partnership and leverage grant funding for CPED, Regulatory Services, and the Park Board.


Description of the change

In the next 10 years, 200,000 trees will come down in Minneapolis due to Emerald Ash Borer. The majority of those trees are on private property. Neither the City nor the Park Board has a citywide strategy on private property trees. The Health Department currently devotes a portion of an existing FTE to run the City’s Tree Program, which plants 2,000 trees per year. This recommendation would create 1 FTE which would then supervise two grant-funded AmeriCorps Forestry Corps volunteers. The team will work with Minneapolis Park Board, CPED, and Regulatory Services, to create a complete work plan for a health tree canopy consisting of a campaign, policy tools, financing, and replanting strategies on private property. The program position would also set a goal to more than double the number of trees planted annually to 4,000 trees annually by 2024 while incorporating biochar, regenerative land practices, and carbon sequestration strategies. This combined effort puts Minneapolis at the forefront in environmental policy.


Equity impacts and results

This recommendation will reduce racial disparities (anecdotal/no data).


The 2011 tornado that hit North Minneapolis destroyed a swath of trees that have not yet been replaced. The impacts of emerald ash borer will be felt disproportionately by high percentage BIPOC neighborhoods, renters, and low-income property owners. The City’s Green Zones have some of the lowest percentages of tree canopy, as low as 5% in a city with a 28% tree canopy coverage. We need intentional strategies to focus on these communities. Without a Tree Program Coordinator each successive setback to our urban forest will impact disproportionately these same communities. Hiring a coordinator puts the City in a better position to develop and implement a citywide tree strategy, which is a key component of our environmental justice strategies.


The program would measure total trees planted and carbon sequestered from tree planting with an intentional focus on plantings in the Green Zones. We would also specifically track the number of ash trees removed and replaced and impacts the following program goal and associated metric.


Goal: To develop and execute on a citywide tree strategy on private property


Objective:

  • Develop a strategy in partnership with Regulatory Services, CPED and the Minneapolis Park Board for private properties
  • Be intentional in strategy and implementation to reduce the burden of emerald ash borer on BIPOC communities and low income properties 
  • Replant on private properties leveraging city and grant funding to replace tree canopy especially in environmental justice communities

Metric:

  • Properties assisted on removing trees
  • Trees replanted
  • Carbon equivalent in addressing climate change