Public Safety

Proposal Details of the Council Adopted ARP Spending, Phase 1

Adolescent-Specific Group Violence Intervention

Research suggests that a large percentage of homicides and shootings are driven by a small number of individuals who are connected to each other through groups. Existing services focused on group-involved violence are in place, but they aren’t specifically designed to serve young people 19 and under who are group-involved.


Group Violence Intervention services designed specifically for young people ages 19 and under intended the reduce likelihood of involvement with gun violence. Through partnership with juvenile justice system partners, social services, and community, services will provide support and resources for young people to take a path away from serious violence.



Civilianization

Major American cities saw over a 30% increase in homicides in 2020 and 2021 appears to be following a similar trend. As of May 17th, Minneapolis homicides were almost double for the same time over 2020 and violent crime was up 13.5% over the same time period. Many of these historic crime trends are centered around young adults and juveniles. The pandemic has exacerbated many of the problems and had a significant impact on this age group. Recent statistics show that just under two-thirds of 18-24 years old exhibit signs of a wide range of mental health issues. In Minneapolis, gunshot wound victims have increased by 161% year over year for the first 20 weeks in 2021 (74 to 187) while 911 response staffing (Patrol: Lieutenant, Sergeant, Officer) has decreased from 478 in April 2020 to 317 in May 2021. With the significant reduction in sworn staffing combined with high recent crime trends, the MPD is looking for more efficient ways to utilize limited sworn resources to help meet the public safety needs of the community.


With the reduction of sworn FTEs some administrative and support work, previously performed by sworn staff, should be performed by civilians. In the last 5 or so years, the MPD has endeavored to civilianize certain positions to use City resources more efficiently. Some positions that could be civilianized are currently filled by officers and civilianization would enable those officers to go to law enforcement positions improving the work in the positions through hiring of people educated and experienced in those areas. Additional civilian support for administrative purposes would also allow officers to concentrate on law enforcement in all Bureaus and would be a more efficient use of resources.

Community Safety Specialist Pilot Program

Throughout the pandemic, many cities have seen a rise in crime. This program seeks to increase public safety through community leadership and unarmed preventative strategies.

Funding will support the Community Safety Specialist (CSS) Apprenticeship Program. This state-accredited certified apprenticeship offers over 180 hours of paid classroom instruction, and 2,000 hours of on-the-job training, to community members who are deployed with professional support to address homelessness, mental health crises, addiction, domestic abuse, and other trauma.

Community Trauma Response Protocols

Victims and witnesses of violence experience trauma that requires an immediate response. Community members are oftentimes ineligible for state and county crime victim reparations funds for various reasons such as criminal history, type of support requested such as property loss or damage, and timely healing services.


The Community Trauma Response Protocols will provide support to community members who are victims/witnesses of violence. Stabilization in the community, supportive direct service such as a mental health and wellness, food security, repairs i.e. shattered glass, bullet holes etc. and memorial and funeral support are necessary to better manage the spread of trauma services and to build trust between city government and communities most impacted by violence.

Contracting with Local Law Enforcement Agencies - Investigators

Major American cities saw over a 30% increase in homicides in 2020, and 2021 appears to be following a similar trend. As of May 17th, Minneapolis homicides were almost double for the same time over 2020 and violent crime was up 13.5% for the same time period over 2020. Many of these historic crime trends are centered around young adults and juveniles. The pandemic has had significant impact on this age group and recent statistics show that close to two-thirds of 18-24 years old exhibit signs of a wide range of mental health issues. In Minneapolis, gunshot wound victims have increased by 161% year over year for the first 20 weeks in 2021 (74 to 187 individuals) while 911 response staffing (Patrol: Lieutenant, Sergeant, Officer) has decreased from 478 in April 2020 to 317 in May 2021 and Investigator staffing has declined from 201 to 143 from 2020 to 2021. The decrease in staff has resulted in fewer proactive investigations resulting in fewer guns being recovered (decrease of 22% between 2020 and 2021).


The initial emergence of carjackings clearly correlates with the pandemic shutdown progression. From the initial shutdown and school closings on March 17 to May 25, carjackings increased 141.6% in 2020 compared the same time period of 2019. Many of these suspects were described as teenagers – notable given the state’s school closures due to COVID-19.

Violent crime cases are on the rise in Minneapolis. Staffing levels are such that investigators are receiving a large volume of case assignments. The benefit of additional resources would allow for these cases to be investigated without the burden of such a high volume of cases assigned per investigator.


MPD would like to offer outside agency investigators the opportunity to work for MPD. This would entail offering agencies like Hennepin County Sherriff Deputies or Metro Transit officers (with authorization from their leadership) to work with MPD Investigators to follow up on investigations and work proactive investigations.



Contracting with Local Law Enforcement Agencies - Patrol

Major American cities saw over a 30% increase in homicides in 2020 and 2021 appears to be following a similar trend. As of May 17th, Minneapolis homicides were almost double for the same time over 2020 and violent crime was up 13.5% for the same period over 2020. Many of these historic crime trends are centered around young adults and juveniles. The pandemic has had significant impact on this age group and recent statistics show that close to two-thirds of those 18-24 years old exhibit signs of a wide range of mental health issues. In Minneapolis, gunshot wound victims have increased by 161% year over year for the first 20 weeks in 2021 (74 to 187 individuals) while 911 response staffing (Patrol: Lieutenant, Sergeant, Officer) has decreased from 478 in April 2020 to 317 in May 2021.


Budgetary constraints, the lengthy lead time needed for hiring and training new recruits, and recent increased crime trends have aggravated the staffing concerns. MPD has determined the need for the deployment of additional law enforcement resources to enhance its current capabilities. MPD would like to hire outside agency officers and contract with surrounding law enforcement agencies to assist the MPD Patrol Bureau with call response and with assisting on specific details. This would entail offering agencies like Hennepin County Sherriff Deputies or Metro Transit officers (with authorization from their leaders) to provide high visibility patrols.

Early Intervention for Young People

Early intervention services intended to reduce risk factors for violence for young people (and their families) who may be at risk of involvement with violence but who are not already deeply system involved. Services will be informed by positive youth development and will draw from case management and mentorship practices.


This is an expansion of an existing activity (Inspiring Youth). This work would support the Office of Violence Prevention’s comprehensive approach to preventing, intervening in, and supporting healing from violence.


Funding would pay for a contract with a community-based organization that serves youth and families who will provide program services. That contract would cover costs of staffing (primarily Youth and Family Workers), resources for program participants and their families to support their success, and program administration costs.


In 2021, $166,000 funding would cover 4 months’ worth of operating costs (September – December) because time would be needed to hire and onboard additional staff. That timeline could change depending on any needs from procurement related to an increased contract amount. Beginning in 2022, the annual amount needed to achieve the same level of service would be $500,000. Because this funding would necessitate contractor hiring staff to provide services, the proposal would only be viable with multi-year funding.

Group Violence Intervention - Overtime

In Minneapolis, gunshot wound victims have increased by 161% year over year for the first 20 weeks in 2021 while 911 response staffing (Patrol: Lieutenant, Sergeant, Officer) has decreased from 478 in April 2020 to 317 in May 2021. Investigations staffing has decreased by 29% from 201 to 143 sworn during that same time. This is a nationwide trend and data and studies suggest much of this increase in violent crime can be tied to the pandemic.


The Group Violence Intervention Program (GVI) reduces violent crime by combining community with law enforcement and community corrections workers to directly engage with the most active street groups and communicate a message of antiviolence, consequences, and an offer of support and help. Part of the success of the GVI program has been teaming up a Minneapolis police officer with a community corrections worker and an employee from the Office of Violence Prevention (OVP) to meet with group members. This form of collaborative outreach allows for a custom notification be provided with the message that all Minneapolis residents can be safe, alive, and free. But with our diminished resources and necessity to focus on public safety, we have been unable to fully commit to this part of the program. The COVID – 19 pandemic limited opportunities to conduct this outreach work when MPD partners were forced to work from home. The reduction of pandemic restrictions should allow for more engagement opportunities.


MPD currently has four sworn staff who have the training to help with this program. MPD would like to use funds to train additional sworn staff in this technique to work with community corrections and OVP to conduct more custom notifications. As our violent crimes involving group members continues to rise, these outreach opportunities are more important than ever. Funding would provide overtime for training and then for the continuation of GVI notification work for 2021.

MinneapolUS Strategic Outreach Initiative

In 2020 and 2021, the City has experienced an increase in shootings and violent crime. The Office of Violence Prevention employs three evidence-based strategies that have been shown to reduce violent crime nationally—hospital-based violence intervention, Group Violence Intervention, and violence interrupters. The violence interrupter strategy (MinneapolUS Strategic Outreach Initiative) was piloted in 2020 and will be implemented more broadly in 2021, but additional resources are needed to support more Violence Interrupters.


Through this initiative, Outreach Workers will provide peacemaking/peacekeeping, violence interruption, and community engagement through street- and community-based outreach. The initiative is intended to reduce risk factors for violence and promote safe, healthy, and thriving communities.

Neighborhood Traffic Calming

Residents often have concerns related to traffic speeds, volumes, safety and how these factors affect their quality of life. Focusing on Cultural Districts and ACP50s (ARPA Guidance: Serving the hardest-hit communities) there is a need to react to these problems, but the department currently has limited resources for this work.


Funding for strategic traffic calming installations such as temporary or permanent speed humps, temporary alley speed humps, and temporary pinch points in Cultural Districts and ACP50 areas.

Portable and Fixed Camera Expansion

Major American cities saw over a 30% increase in homicides in 2020 and 2021 appears to be following a similar trend. As of May 17th, Minneapolis homicides were almost double for the same time over 2020 and violent crime was up 13.5% for the same period. Many of these historic crime trends are centered around young adults and juveniles. The pandemic has had significant impact on this age group and recent statistics show that close to two-thirds of those 18-24 years old exhibit signs of a wide range of mental health issues. In Minneapolis, gunshot wound victims have increased by 161% year over year for the first 20 weeks in 2021 (74 to 187) while 911 response staffing (Patrol: Lieutenant, Sergeant, Officer) has decreased from 478 in April 2020 to 317 in May 2021.


With the significant reduction in sworn FTEs combined with high recent crime trends, the MPD is seeking alternative preventative policing measures or measures that could assist in investigations of crime. One alternative is the use of portable or fixed cameras, which are widely requested by communities and neighborhood organizations, to both deter crime and help solve crime. MPD proposes expanding the fleet of mobile/fixed cameras for use in areas of high crime or hotspots to both deter crime and to aid in investigations. Cameras would be viewed in real time during periods of high crime and used to clear /assist during 911 calls. Recorded camera footage can be utilized by investigators to help develop leads as well as share informational requests with the community.



Public Safety Workforce Training: Community Service Officers

Major American cities saw over a 30% increase in homicides in 2020 and 2021 appears to be following a similar trend. As of May 17th, Minneapolis homicides were almost double for the same time over 2020 and violent crime was up 13.5% for the same time period in 2020. Many of these historic crime trends are centered around young adults and juveniles. The pandemic has had significant impact on this age group and recent statistics show that close to two-thirds of those 18-24 years old exhibit signs of a wide range of mental health issues. In Minneapolis, gunshot wound victims have increased by 161% year over year for the first 20 weeks in 2021 (74 to 187) while 911 response staffing (Patrol: Lieutenant, Sergeant, Officer) has decreased from 478 in April 2020 to 317 in May 2021. The MPD is seeking ways to provide a more visible law enforcement presence until staffing numbers stabilize, assist community members with issues, and help detect problems that can be communicated to sworn officers before they escalate.


The MPD established the Community Service Officer (CSO) program. A Community Service Officer (CSO) works approximately 20-40 hours per week in the Minneapolis Police Department for up to three years while enrolled as a student in an approved, two-year law enforcement program and working toward completion of MN Peace Officers Standards and Training (POST) licensing requirements. MPD supports CSOs in their education and vocational training through tuition payments.


CSOs can be placed in locations throughout the city as eyes for the MPD and can also give a uniformed presence and assist citizens with issues. CSOs rotate through various departments and jobs within the MPD allowing them to gain training, a clearer understanding of law enforcement and provides support in various departments. CSOs would help in this capacity for up to 3 years and then also be in the pipeline for the Recruit Academy when qualified. Funding includes payroll/fringe of approximately $60,000 per CSO, tuition ($8,000), uniform ($1,000), and other ($2000) for a total of $71,000 per CSO annually.

School Based Clinic Expansion

The pandemic has caused significant adolescent isolation and stress. School Based Clinics (SBCs) has an increased demand for adolescent mental health services and reached its capacity to accept new mental health clients. Students who cannot be served by SBCs forgo treatment or may obtain less affordable and convenient treatment in the community.


Through the School Based Mental Health program, two additional SBC Mental Health Professionals will provide evidence-based mental health treatment to 120 teens per year to promote behaviors that reduce the risk of ongoing serious mental illness. Adolescent clients will receive from 2 to 30 visits resulting in an addition of 350 to 450 visits annually.


Stabilization Services for High Risk Individuals

The number one barrier for participants in the Group Violence Intervention (“GVI”) program, Next Step, and Minneapol-US/ Interrupters, is access to independent housing. Participants who are unable to access safe, independent housing are less likely to successfully complete the program and end the cycle of violence. The development of the OVP Housing Initiative would address this need.


The OVP Housing Initiative will provide significant pathways towards stabilizations and reductions in clients likelihood for violence perpetration and victimizations. Housing is in high demand in all three programs and current budgets cannot meet the existing need.

Violent Crime Hot Spot Task Force

Major American cities saw over a 30% increase in homicides in 2020 and 2021 appears to be following a similar trend. As of May 17th, Minneapolis homicides were almost double for the same time over 2020 and violent crime was up 13.5% for the same period over 2020. Many of these historic crime trends are centered around young adults and juveniles. The pandemic has exacerbated the problem and it has also had significant impact on this age group. Recent statistics show that close to two-thirds of those 18-24 years old exhibit signs of a wide range of mental health issues. In Minneapolis, gunshot wound victims have increased by 161% year over year for the first 20 weeks in 2021 (74 to 187 individuals) while 911 response staffing (Patrol: Lieutenant, Sergeant, Officer) has decreased from 478 in April 2020 to 317 in May 2021 and Investigator staffing has declined from 201 to 143 from 2020 to 2021.


MPD would like to offer overtime to officers to develop strategies to reduce crime within specific hot spot areas and to staff 12 shifts per week to address these troubling areas. Other strategies may also be utilized to complement the additional law enforcement staffing such as camera placement, other.



Youth and Community Safety Fund

Public health, community safety, and youth opportunities have all been significantly impacted over the last year due to the myriad, layered effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Minneapolis Health Department will develop and administer an RFP process to distribute money to community-based partners to support community health and safety programming and youth opportunities.


The total approved amount of $2,250,000 will be allocated to the following:


• $1,250,000 to the Youth and Community Health Fund with $250,000 dedicated to programming in Cultural Districts to address public health disparities exacerbated by the pandemic,

• $750,000 to the Violence Prevention Fund with $250,000 of this total dedicated to programming in Cultural Districts to ameliorate the national increase in violent crime as a result of the pandemic, and

• $250,000 for Group Violence Intervention technical assistance to increase public safety particularly in low-income and vulnerable communities.