BIK28 - Protected Bikeways Program


Project Details:

Project Start Date: 4/15/2024

Estimated Project Completion Date: 11/15/2029

Ongoing Program: Y

Current Phase: Planning / Design / Construction

Level of Need: Significant

Department Priority: 20 of 58


Submitting Agency: Public Works

Contact Person: Luke Hanson

Contact Phone Number: 612-875-7237

Contact Email: [email protected]

Website:

Prior year(s) bond authorization amount: $1,400,000

Project Location:

Address: Various Locations Citywide

City Sector: Various Locations Citywide

Affected Neighborhoods: Various Locations Citywide

Affected Wards: Various Locations Citywide

Project Description

This program will implement low-stress bikeways on streets identified in the Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan. Sometimes referred to as “protected bike lanes” or “cycletracks”, protected bikeways are physically separated from motor vehicle traffic and are intended to provide a similar user experience as off-street trails. Physical separation may be provided through parked cars, curbs, medians, bollards/flexible traffic posts, planters, or other vertical features.

Purpose and Justification

To make bicycling, in all its new forms, a real option for more people, the Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan established numerous strategies and actions to upgrade and expand the All Ages and Abilities Network over the next ten years. This network will include protected lanes and trails that are physically separated from moving cars, trucks and buses, will feature improved intersection crossings and be accessible year-round. The goal for the All Ages and Abilities Network is for people on bikes to only share space with cars on quiet low-speed streets or on neighborhood greenways. There are some parts of the city where potential bicycling demand is high, but where low-stress bikeways such as trails, bike boulevards, and lower-traffic streets aren’t an option. To continue to grow bicycling in Minneapolis, new types of infrastructure are needed to make Minneapolis easier to bike for people of all ages and abilities.

Project Visuals and Map

Upload maps or additional files that you feel are important for the CLIC members, Mayor, City Council members or the general public to have access to with regards to this project and in consideration of its approval.

Project Cost Breakdown

Submitting Agency Funding Request

Asset Condition and Project Investment

The City of Minneapolis is moving towards an enterprise-wide capital asset management strategy. Asset management is a planning tool and a decision-making framework that supports resource allocation over the long-term. It is a comprehensive and continuous process focused on assessing the value and condition of assets with the goal of minimizing the total lifecycle cost of ownership while providing the required Level of Service expected by all stakeholders and aligning those investments with the City’s strategic goals.


Asset Condition

Please select the asset type: Horizontal Infrastructure - Street

Is this request a new capital project or an existing project? New / Existing

If the project is an existing asset, what is the observed remaining life of the asset?


The functional lifespan of a newly reconstructed street is roughly 60 years with properly timed maintenance and repair. Public Works manages the local street system based upon the expected pavement life span through a series of reoccurring pavement repair and maintenance activities such as asphalt resurfacing, concrete rehabilitation, seal coat, pothole repair, and other maintenance treatments that extend the functional lifespan of the City’s street, alley and trail assets.


What is the current condition of the asset? Please describe the metrics you use to assess the condition of the asset.


Public Works uses the Pavement Condition Index (PCI) procedures as defined in ASTM D6433, in which a host of pavement distresses are identified, quantified and then imported into a pavement management software for further evaluation. Because BIK28 is a program that operates City-wide, asset conditions will vary. Typically, BIK28 constructs new trail facilities or updates facilities that are in "fair” or “poor” condition. This program will implement protected bikeways on streets identified in the Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan. Physical separation may be provided through parked cars, curbs, medians, bollards/flexible traffic posts, planters, or other vertical features.


What is the expected useful life of the project/improvement?


Bike and pedestrian infrastructure’s useful lifespan may vary with temporary materials but are annually maintained.


Investment/Cost of Deferred Maintenance

If this project is not funded, what are the costs (ex. increased maintenance costs) of deferring the project? Are there operating impacts associated with deferring or canceling this project?


Resurfacing and rehabilitation projects/programs are aimed at extending the useful life of the street. It is Public Work’s goal to maintain a good state of repair through preventative maintenance activities. Resurfacing and rehabilitation projects reduce the need for more costly asset management activities such as street reconstruction.


What is the funding strategy for this asset over the long term? Does this project leverage additional non-City funding sources? If so, are they contingent on city funding for this project?


Regular crack sealing and other preventative maintenance treatments will be needed to keep the road and trail surface in good shape, which will be paid through the existing maintenance budget. See Partnerships section for additional non-City funding sources. Yes those funding sources are contingent on City funding.


Service Level

What, if any, regulatory, industry or environmental standards does this asset need to perform to? Please describe these elements and how it is currently performing.


Public Works has developed specifications and standard detail plates specific to Minneapolis construction and design requirements for use by contractors, consultants, and city crews to build public infrastructure, including streets, bridges, sewer, water, traffic, and forestry. Transportation projects align with the guidance illustrated in the Minneapolis Street Design Guide, and/or the MnDOT's State-Aid Operations design standards if the street is classified as a Municipal State Aid route. Additional public roadway requirements for traffic signs, pavement markings, and signals are included in the Minnesota Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (state.mn.us). If a linear construction project disturbs more than 0.5 acres of land, the design must capture and retain stormwater runoff over the new and fully reconstructed impervious area per the Stormwater Management Ordinance, with asphalt resurfacing, concrete rehabilitation, sidewalk, and trail projects continuing to be exempt.


This program will implement protected bikeways on streets identified in the Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan. Sometimes referred to as “protected bike lanes” or “cycletracks”, protected bikeways are physically separated from motor vehicle traffic and are intended to provide a similar user experience as off-street trails. Physical separation may be provided through parked cars, curbs, medians, bollards/flexible traffic posts, planters, or other vertical features. The program will also perform mill and overlays of trail sections to maintain and improve the condition of trails owned by the City.

What does a full service level entail for this project? If an existing project, are we currently either meeting this or missing this target? On a scale of 1-5, please rank the project as it relates to service level (1 is "complete failure - no service delivery/life safety risk", 3 is "the asset works, but not well", and 5 is "perfect - people love it").


To make bicycling, in all its new forms, a real option for more people, the Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan established numerous strategies and actions to upgrade and expand the All Ages and Abilities Network over the next ten years. This network will include protected lanes and trails that are physically separated from moving cars, trucks and buses, will feature improved intersection crossings and be accessible year-round. The goal for the All Ages and Abilities Network is for people on bikes to only share space with cars on quiet low-speed streets or on neighborhood greenways. There are some parts of the city where potential bicycling demand is high, but where low-stress bikeways such as trails, bike boulevards, and lower-traffic streets aren’t an option. To continue to grow bicycling in Minneapolis, new types of infrastructure are needed to make Minneapolis easier to bike for people of all ages and abilities. The Protected Bikeways program seeks to improve transportation assets categorized as level 3 and 4 as it pertains to the condition of the street or trail asset.

Partnerships

Have Grants for this project been secured? If yes, please include grant source and amount.


Yes


Describe status and timing details of secured or applied for grants or other non-City funding sources:


The City received $3,760,000 of federal funding from the Metropolitan Council in 2024 for the Hennepin-Dunwoody bikeway project. In addition, the City received $4,512,000 in federal funding from the Metropolitan Council for the 9th/10th street bikeways in 2026, and $4,000,000 in federal funding for the 2nd street north bikeway in 2027.


Describe any collaborative arrangements with outside project partners, including who they are and what their role is with the project:


N/A


Describe any inclusion of public art with the project or collaboration with Art in Public Places:


None

Economic Development

Will the project contribute to growth in the City’s tax base? Maintains existing tax base.


Describe the economic development impact of the project:


Maintains existing tax base.


Does the project support redevelopment opportunity that without the project would be infeasible?


N/A

Transportation

Is the proposed project on an existing or planned transitway, transit route, or high-volume pedestrian corridor? If yes, provide details on how the project will improve the transit and/or pedestrian experience.


All of these routes are identified in the Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan a low street bikeway on the All Ages All Abilities Bicycle Network. Many of these routes are in high-volume pedestrian corridors and most are along or provide connections to transit corridors. Protected bikeways are part of an overall strategy to improve multimodal transportation choices in Minneapolis and make it easier to get around without a private motor vehicle.


Does the proposed project anticipate multi-modal enhancements (sidewalks, bicycle or transit facilities)? Provide details.


These projects will provide a more comfortable bicycle facility than standard bike lanes.


Is the right-of-way constrained and do you anticipate that modes of travel will be competing for space? Provide details, is there potential for innovative design options? Provide details.


Yes, right-of-way is constrained in most of these corridors, and there are generally tradeoffs in most of these corridors with traffic lanes and parking lanes; however, these corridors are the result of a feasibility analysis of the best opportunities for near-term implementation of protected bikeways in Minneapolis.

Operations and Maintenance

Will the request maintain or reduce current operating and maintenance costs or will it add to or create new operating or maintenance costs?


Generally, for street or alley paving or bridge projects, the Public Works operating budget is not adjusted annually based on capital improvements because when one street/alley or bridge is improved, the operating and maintenance funding is moved to elsewhere in the system. However, many projects in the Non-motorized and/or Traffic programs include the installation of *new* infrastructure and/or the use of temporary materials. These types of projects do have an impact on the annual Public Works operating budget which is adjusted annually to account for the new infrastructure and/or temporary material installations.


What is the estimated annual operating cost increase or (decrease) for this project?


Year that Operating Incr/(Decr) will take effect? 2024


Describe how operating cost increases or decreases were determined and include details such as personnel costs, materials, contracts, energy savings, etc:


There is no net change in the annual operating budget; Public Works will reallocate those dollars to aging infrastructure elsewhere in the system. Public Works is still assessing the costs of maintenance for protected bikeways. A winter walking and biking study is currently underway. Public Works is having ongoing discussions regarding the appropriate level of maintenance for protected bikeways, particularly for winter operations including plowing.


If new infrastructure, discuss how the department/agency will pay for the increased annual operating costs:


Maintenance costs for protected bikeways will vary depending on the type of facility installed. Public Works has calculated estimates for annual maintenance of protected bikeways, although it is based on a very small sample of locations and does not include an extended history of seasonal weather events. As more protected bikeway projects are implemented Public Works will better understand maintenance costs and expects to build efficiencies into its operations.


For new infrastructure, describe the estimated timing and dollar amount of future capital investment required to realize the full expected useful life of the project:


Refer to answers above.

Project Coordination

Describe completion status for ongoing projects and how and when the department/agency plans to use the prior year remaining bond authorizations:


Public Works will carry forward any prior remaining bond authorizations to future program or project years


If this is a new project, describe the major project phases and timing anticipated for completing the project:


Minneapolis Public Works anticipates preliminary design and public involvement to begin approximately two years prior to the start of project construction.


Scalability/Funding Allocation Flexibility – discuss any flexibility to increase or decrease funding among the years in the five-year plan and the most that could be spent in a given year:


Individual project construction costs are generally proposed in the year that a project is anticipated to be bid, which is required for a bid to be successfully awarded. For annual programs, if program funding is reduced in a given year, less work will occur in that program year.

Minneapolis City Goals

Minneapolis is an intentionally compassionate city where each of us can reach our full potential while caring for one another, eliminating racial disparities, improving our environment and promoting social well-being. We lead in innovative and creative ways, focused not only on our present needs, but also the success of future generations.


Public Safety - The City prioritizes collaborative and community-inclusive strategies to ensure safety for all members of our community.

Housing - The City prioritizes equitable access to safe, stable, accessible and affordable housing to eliminate racial disparities in housing.

Economic Development - The City prioritizes economic inclusion so that all workers and families are supported and Black, Indigenous and People of Color-owned businesses in all sectors can thrive.

Public Services - The City prioritizes reliable and equitable access to high-quality public services.

Environmental Justice - The City prioritizes sustainable practices and renewable resources to equitably address climate change while restoring and protecting our soil, water and air.

Built Environment and Transportation - The City prioritizes high-quality neighborhoods, streets, infrastructure and equitable access to multimodal transportation in all parts of the city through thoughtful planning and design.

Public Health - The City prioritizes positive youth development so that all children can grow healthy and safe.

Arts and Culture - The City prioritizes arts and culture as an important part of inclusive economic development and placemaking in our communities.


Which of the above goals are furthered by the project? Please describe how the project furthers these goals.

Minneapolis is a growing and vibrant world-class city with a flourishing economy and a pristine environment, where all people are safe, healthy and have equitable opportunities for success and happiness.

Below is a description of how this project meets each of the City's Goals.


Public Safety

Collaborative and community-inclusive strategies to ensure safety for all members of our community:


Transportation Action Plan – Safety Goal to reach Vision Zero by prioritizing safety for all people and eliminate traffic fatalities and severe injuries by 2027.


ADA Transition Plan for Public Works – Identify accessibility barriers, establish priorities for improvement, and develop an implementation plan for removing accessibility barriers in the City’s public right of way.


Vision Zero Action Plan – The City is committed to eliminating all serious and fatal injuries on city streets by 2027.


Complete Streets Policy – The City of Minneapolis is committed to building a complete and integrated public right of way to ensure that everyone can travel safely and comfortably along and across a street regardless of whether they are walking, biking, taking transit, or driving.


Minneapolis Street Design Guide – The Street Design Guide provides street design guidance in alignment with existing city policies, including those aimed at accessibility and safety in the City’s public right of way.


Public Health

The City has declared racism a public health emergency, noting that “racism in all its forms causes persistent discrimination and disparate outcomes in many areas of life.” Public Works recognizes the impact of racism in transportation systems and this program/project seeks to promote transportation equity and justice in accordance with the goals of the Strategic & Racial Equity Action Plan 2019-2022 by providing equitable access to multimodal transportation in all parts of the City through thoughtful planning and design.


The Minneapolis Transportation Action Plan includes a Progress section that has a series of strategies and actions to define a more intentional approach toward racial equity and justice in the plan. These strategies are:


1. Implement a racial equity framework for transportation

2. Build trust and achieve greater outcomes through equitable engagement

3. Create transparent and accountable measure for evaluation of plans, programs, and projects


Environmental Justice

The City prioritizes sustainable practices and renewable resources to equitably address climate change while restoring and protecting our soil, water and air.


The City of Minneapolis seeks to prioritize sustainable practices to advance the vision laid out in the Minneapolis Climate Action Plan and supported by The Transportation Action Plan.


Plan, design, build, maintain, and operate the city’s transportation system in a way that prioritizes pedestrians first, followed by bicycling and transit use, and lastly motor vehicle use. (Complete Streets Policy. Adopted December 2021.)


Reduce the energy, carbon, and health impacts of transportation by reaching the City’s mode share goal where 3 of every 5 trips taken by walking, rolling, bicycling or transit by 2030.


Support development and public realm improvements near existing and planned transit stations that result in walkable districts for living, working, shopping, and recreating.


Proactively improve the public realm to support a pedestrian friendly, high-quality and distinctive built environment.


Improve the tree canopy and urban forest.


Improve air quality by reducing emissions of pollutants that harm human health and the environment.


Built Environment and Transportation

The City prioritizes high quality neighborhoods, streets, infrastructure and equitable access to multimodal transportation in all parts of the City through thoughtful planning and design.


The City of Minneapolis will promote design for the built environment that is dynamic and durable, reflects the diversity of Minneapolis residents, and contributes to a sense of place and community identity. The City will also proactively improve the public realm, including streets, sidewalks, parks and open spaces between buildings, to ensure that public spaces and private development are thoughtfully connected.


Racial Equity Impact Analysis

Data

List the specific geographies that will be impacted and the racial demographics of constituents in those areas.


Minneapolis Citywide

  • White: 60.1%
  • Of Color: 36.9%
    • Black or African American alone: 18.2%
    • American Indian and Alaskan Native alone: 1.0%
    • Asian or Pacific Islander alone: 5.6%
    • Other alone: 0.5%
    • Two or more races alone: 4.7%
  • Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 9.8%

What does available data tell you about how constituents from BIPOC communities currently relate to the desired outcome compared to white constituents?


During engagement for the Transportation Action Plan the City held several community dialogues (small group discussions) with communities of different cultures, languages and abilities. The top three needs from each discussion offer some insight into the priorities discussed in each community dialogue. A full summary of each of these conversations can be found here: http://go.minneapolismn.gov/get-involved


African American Community Dialogue:

1. Create multiple options for convenient, safe, and efficient transportation.

2. Improve the transit experience by addressing safety, comfort, and affordability.

3. Build and maintain higher levels of pedestrian scale lighting.


East African Community Dialogue:

1. Build safer crossings for pedestrians and design treatments to slow speeding cars.

2. Improve lighting to increase safety in the public space.

3. Take action on projects that will improve the community.


Latino Community Dialogue:

1. Improve year-round transportation options for people who do not drive.

2. Maintain sidewalks and bikeways during the winter.

3. Make transit facilities feel more welcoming and safer.


Native American Community Dialogue:

1. Address safety and illegal vehicle behavior such as speeding and running red lights.

2. Increase access to transit and shared mobility through education and outreach.

3. Collaborate with community on addressing transportation issues.


Southeast Asian

1. Build long-term relationships and provide training on accessing new modes of travel.

2. Address personal safety concerns through lighting, cameras and technology.

3. Build and maintain infrastructure that makes travel easy and safe.


What data is available or missing? How can you obtain additional data?


In recent years Public Works conducted engagement for the Transportation Action Plan and the 20-Year Streets Funding Plan, both of which included engagement around equity. The summaries of these engagement efforts offer a variety of data that help give insight into issues around transportation equity.


The 20-Year Streets Funding Plan engagement summary can be found in Appendix B of the 20-Year Streets Funding Plan, which includes participant responses to questions and high-level summaries.


The summary of engagement for the Transportation Action Plan can be found on the engagement page of the website. As part of that engagement Public Works held seven community dialogues to connect with communities of different cultures, languages and abilities through small group discussions. Summaries from these conversations and other engagement related to racial equity can be found on the website and are a useful data source to help apply an equity lens to transportation planning and programming.


The primary equity-focused dataset that Public Works uses is the Equity Considerations Dataset from the Metropolitan Council. This dataset provides equity-relevant characteristics for each census tract in the Twin Cities region. Formerly known as the Areas of Concentrated Poverty dataset, it has been greatly expanded to provide a more nuanced portrait of neighborhoods, with data on: demographic and socioeconomic characteristics (including multiple income levels); racial/ethnic/cultural groups; historical data on discriminatory practices; facets of housing markets; land use, environment/climate, amenities, and employment/commuting patterns.


Community Engagement

Using the international Association of Public Participation (IAP2) Public Participation Spectrum, which participation strategy or strategies was used, or will you use, when engaging those who would be most impacted?


Along the IAP2 Public Participation Spectrum, transportation projects and programs within Public Works typically fall between inform and involve. However, in some instances, projects or programs may reach collaborate. The level of engagement for each project will be determined via a series of factors including but not limited to project phase, stakeholder type, geographic location, project scale/budget, equity considerations, and guidance from the Racial Equity Framework for Transportation (Goal 1 Strategy 1) and the Transportation Action Plan (Strategy 2). Possible levels for transportation projects and programs engagement include:

Inform. Public participation goal: To provide the public with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions.


Consult. Public participation goal: To obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

Involve. Public participation goal: To work directly with the public throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

Collaborate. Public participation goal: To partner with the public in each aspect of the decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred solution.


Describe the engagement and what have you learned?


The main engagement that informed the selection of this project/program was held during engagement for the 20-Year Streets Funding Plan. During the development of the 20-Year Streets Funding Plan, Public Works developed a criteria-based process with a focus on racial and economic equity to prioritize street projects on an annual basis. The process is data driven, but also creates and seizes opportunities to align with established city goals and priorities. The criteria and relative weighting were informed by staff, public, and stakeholder input. The criteria specifically apply to the selection of street paving capital projects. A full summary of the engagement for the plan can be found in Appendix B, which includes individual participant responses and various themes that were identified after analysis of the responses.


Analysis

How does the outcome for this project help the city achieve racial equity?


Our data shows that by focusing on creating more options for people, we are providing opportunities for low-income and people of color in our community. Key data that make the explicit link between our work and advancing options for people who face economic disadvantages in Minneapolis include:

  • 19% of residents live below 100% of the federal poverty thresholds (household income dependent on family size and composition); this number is 39% for black people, 34% for people of color and 15% for white people
  • 22% of residents live in high poverty neighborhoods; this number is 38% for black people, 34% for people of color and 15% for white people
  • 27% people of color households do not have access to a car; this number is 11% for white households
  • Average commute time for white workers is 22 minutes versus 24 minutes for people of color workers and 27 minutes for black workers

Minneapolis faces some of the gravest racial inequities in the nation. The data above point to how that plays out in transportation options for people. Given this data, it is clear that by focusing on creating more and safer options for people to walk, bike, take transit, and access shared mobility services, we are advancing outcomes that can be directly felt by people experiencing hardship.



Additional Information

Any additional information you feel is important for the CLIC committee, Mayor, City Councilmembers or the general public to know about this potential project and why it should be approved: Capital improvement projects such as this one complete a corridor and enhance the character of the area which helps preserve property values and the city’s tax base. Protected bikeway projects accomplish two major goals outlined in the Bicycle Master Plan; 1) to improve safety and 2) increase the number of bicyclists. These projects are strategically placed in system gap locations to maximize return on investment and to ensure regional equity.