Neighborhood Safety


Expense and revenue information

Values prior to 2023 reflect the former Office of Violence Prevention program within the Health Department.



Programs and divisions


See additional information on department staffing in the "Administrative adjustments and transfers" section below and in Schedule 5.

Mission and goals

The Neighborhood Safety Department (NSD) uses a community-focused, public health approach to help reduce the impact of violence on our communities. With collaborative, public health-informed responses, we can help prevent violence, intervene in cycles of violence as they’re happening, support those impacted by violence, and heal from violence. We work to break the cycle of violence by addressing it at three points: before it begins, at the first signs of risk, and after it happens. To do that work, we have many programs and initiatives that fall under three primary approaches: evidence-informed strategies, capacity building and innovation, and youth-centered prevention and intervention. The OVP’s work is guided by several core beliefs:


  • Violence is not inevitable.
  • Violence is complex; it is about much more than individual characteristics and choices. Violence has roots in social, economic, political, and cultural conditions.
  • Complex problems require complex solutions. To effectively break cycles of violence, solutions must include long-term upstream approaches and immediate strategies to address pressing needs.
  • Violence takes an unequal toll on communities of color and on specific neighborhoods in Minneapolis.
  • Violence prevention must include work to address systemic inequities.
  • Everyone has a role to play in creating communities that don’t include violence; it takes us all to make our communities safe, healthy, hopeful, and thriving.

Services provided

Evidence-Informed Strategies: We rely on research and evidence. Scientific research points to potential effectiveness of some community violence prevention strategies. We have built local versions of evidence-informed interventions that have been used elsewhere across the country. Specific evidence-informed initiatives include:


  • Next Step: Next Step is a hospital-based program that connects victims of violent injury to resources and support. When someone is treated in the hospital for a violent injury, Next Step works with them on healing from the non-physical aspects of their wounds. Next Step staff provide immediate bedside support for participants and their families. Participants who want additional support with changing their lives and stopping the cycle of violence continue to meet with staff in the community after they leave the hospital. Next Step is a partnership with Hennepin Healthcare/Hennepin County, North Memorial, and Abbott Northwestern and is also funded by the Minnesota Office of Justice Programs.

  • Project LIFE/Group Violence Intervention (GVI): Group Violence Intervention (GVI) reduces street group-involved homicide and gun violence. GVI helps create accountability, fosters internal social pressure within groups that deters violence, and sets clear community standards against violence. GVI also offers a path for group members who want to leave the cycle of violence behind and resources and supports necessary to travel that path.

  • MinneapolUS Strategic Outreach Initiative: The MinneapolUS Strategic Outreach Initiative is a coordinated, public-health driven strategy that treats violence as a contagion and works to prevent and reduce community violence by stopping its spread. Teams of Violence Interrupters are a regular presence in parts of the city. They do not provide law enforcement services; instead, they use informal mediation, non-physical conflict resolution, and interruption expertise to prevent situations from turning violent. They also support behavior change for people who may be at risk for violence and connect people with resources to support them toward a path that does not involve violence. Cure Violence is one model of this kind of work.

Capacity Building and Innovation: We center capacity building and innovation. Scientific research and formal evaluation can sometimes exclude new, innovative, and/or grassroots community approaches. The wisdom and expertise of local community are powerful. We must be responsive to the needs and uniqueness of our local communities. And, we have a responsibility to help incubate promising new community-driven ideas. Specific capacity building and innovation initiatives include:


  • Blueprint Approved Institute (BPI): The Blueprint Approved Institute (BPI) is designed for individuals and smaller grassroots community organizations doing violence prevention work. Through BPI, participants learn skills and build capacity for further development of their organizations, receive funding to provide summer youth violence prevention programming with hands on support and technical assistance, and join a network of violence prevention provider peers.

  • Violence Prevention Fund: The Violence Prevention Fund invests in community-led strategies that address multiple forms of violence in diverse ways. It is built on the understanding that a successful citywide approach to violence prevention must incorporate strategies that are rooted in the experience and wisdom of community-based practitioners. Violence Prevention Fund activities have included things like community building, space activation, youth skills training, youth-led programming, leadership development, street outreach, trauma awareness and resilience work, restorative justice events, partnership development across organizations and systems, community meals, resource referrals, and more.

Youth-centered Prevention and Intervention: Our work’s roots are in youth violence prevention. We focus on reducing risk and building protective factors for young people. By centering young people, we can make a difference for today and tomorrow. Some examples of youth-centered prevention and intervention initiatives include:


  • Inspiring Youth: Inspiring Youth is an early intervention resource for young people (and their families) ages 10-17 experiencing factors that may put them at risk of involvement with violence. Young people are referred by schools and diversion partners. They’re matched with a Youth and Family Worker. That person serves as an additional pro-social adult in the young person’s life while also using deep knowledge of resources to navigate systems. The goal of that work is to promote protective and resiliency factors that can help buffer against risk factors associated with involvement with violence.

  • Youth Connection Center (YCC): Formerly called the Juvenile Supervision Center, the Youth Connection Center (YCC) provides supportive services, needs assessment, resource and referral, and community-based aftercare for young people ages 10-17 who encounter law enforcement for truancy, curfew, and low-level offenses. The YCC is a 24/7 resource shared by the City of Minneapolis, Minneapolis Public Schools, and Hennepin County.

  • Youth Violence Prevention Week (YVP): NSD observes Youth Violence Prevention (YVP) Week annually. During YVP Week, we sponsor a diverse array of community-driven youth-oriented activities including sports tournaments, art and theater performances, healing circles, and educational activities focused on youth empowerment. The goal of this weeklong campaign is to raise awareness about violence as a public health issue and to educate youth, parents, teachers, and the community on effective ways to prevent or reduce youth violence.

To do all of this work, we depend on meaningful community partnerships. In 2021, approximately 75% of NSD spending went to community through contracts. That included contracts with over 75 different partners.


Race equity impacts

Like in much of the country, the burden of many kinds of violence is not distributed equally in Minneapolis. An overwhelming majority of victims of gun violence in Minneapolis are People of Color. While individual factors can contribute to risk of violence, individual-level factors are not what drives disproportionality. Rather, the disproportionate burden of violence impacting People of Color is tied to complex societal-level conditions deeply rooted in structural inequities like redlining and disinvestment, discrimination, lack of economic opportunities, high concentrations of poverty, and under-resourced public services.


NSD initiatives are designed to acknowledge the interconnectedness of systemic inequities and violence and address the complex structural conditions that can increase likelihood of violence. In that way, the work is inextricably tied to race equity work. Through NSD initiatives, individual participants—the majority of whom are likely to identify as part of BIPOC communities—have increased access to resources and services that can help to mitigate some of the harm caused by longstanding structural inequities. At the same time, some OVP initiatives focus on community-level change, working to create community cohesion and other factors that can serve as protective factors to buffer against the harmful impacts of structural inequities. Additionally, some initiatives (e.g., Blueprint Approved Institute) support skill development and capacity building, which can help increase the overall amount of support services available to community and create economic opportunities for predominantly BIPOC-led organizations. Finally, people from BIPOC communities have traditionally been overincarcerated and therefore are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. While violence is the core focus, some OVP initiatives may also play a role in helping to divert people from further system involvement, thereby helping to interrupt the pipeline to prison and reducing potential for all the collateral consequences associated with justice system involvement.

2024 budget proposals


Department of Neighborhood Safety: Domestic Violence Navigators Program

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Community Safety & Police Reform

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 3


Summary

The Council approves $386,491 in ongoing General Fund for the Department of Neighborhood Safety to enhance the Domestic Violence Navigators program.


Description

This proposal will build upon the Domestic Violence Navigators program by adding 1 Program Manager and 2 Domestic Violence Navigators, for a total of 3 new FTEs in 2024. In 2025, there will be an intent to pursue an additional 2 FTEs, for total staffing to include 1 Program Manager and 5 Navigators (1 Navigator per Police Precinct). A fully staffed Domestic Violence Navigators Program will increase our ability to provide services to domestic violence survivors, and increase the accessibility, efficiency, and effectiveness of those services. This proposal will impact domestic violence survivors in the City of Minneapolis.


Domestic Violence is defined as “a pattern of behavior in any relationship that is used to gain or maintain power and control over an intimate partner; physical, sexual, emotional, economic or psychological actions or threats of actions that influence another person, this includes any behaviors that frighten, intimidate, terrorize, manipulate, hurt, humiliate, blame, injure, or wound someone”. Domestic Violence can happen to anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender, it can occur within a range of relationships including couples who are married, living together or dating, and affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV), in Minnesota, 1 in 3 women (33.9%) and 1 in 4 men (25.1%) will experience/have experienced domestic violence in their lifetimes; and on a typical day, local domestic violence hotlines receive approximately 19,159 calls, approximately 13 calls every minute.


In the City of Minneapolis, 1 crime with publicly available data that falls under domestic violence, physical domestic abuse, is domestic aggravated assault. Below are some statistics regarding this data point:


  • In 2023, to date, there have been 2,496 aggravated assaults reported, 817 domestic aggravated assaults reported, which equates to 32.73% of aggravated assaults reported.
  • In 2022, there were 3,070 aggravated assaults reported, 988 domestic aggravated assaults reported, which equates to 32.18% of aggravated assaults reported.
  • In 2021, there were 3,047 aggravated assaults reported, 811 domestic aggravated assaults reported, which equates to 26.62% of aggravated assaults reported.
  • In 2020, there were 2,882 aggravated assaults reported, 896 domestic aggravated assaults reported, which equates to 31.09% of aggravated assaults reported.
  • In 2019, there were 2,227 assaults reported, 968 domestic aggravated assaults reported, which equates to 42.51% of assaults reported.
  • On average 896 domestic aggravated assaulted are reported per year, which equates to 33.03% of aggravated assaults reported.

The added Program Manager will provide operational management for the Domestic Violence Navigators program in the Neighborhood Safety Department and will take responsibility for the implementation of policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in support of survivors of domestic violence in the community, schools, work sectors, etc.


The 2 added Domestic Violence Navigators will continue the work of supporting domestic violence survivors by providing services, as well as by establishing and maintaining partnerships with community safety departments, service providers, and the community at large. The City of Minneapolis currently has 1 Domestic Violence Navigator. This 1 Domestic Violence Navigator is the sole City Staff member in the enterprise tasked with serving and supporting domestic violence survivors. In 2023, the Domestic Violence Navigator has made 710 contacts with domestic violence survivors, and 40% of those contacts have been referred to a local domestic violence agency for additional follow up, support, and services. The Domestic Violence Navigator has also filed 103 protections orders, 80 other court related documents, and has attended 12 court hearings.


Equity

Will reduce racial disparities (anecdotal/no data). This proposal will reduce racial disparities. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCAD:


  • American Indian and Alaska Native women experience domestic violence at much higher rates than women of any other ethnicity.
  • Black women and Black men experience domestic violence at a disproportionately high rate.
  • Individuals with disabilities experience domestic violence at higher rate than individuals without disabilities.

According to Violence Free Minnesota, “a point of emphasis when it comes to racial disparities we see year in and year out is the lack of reporting on intimate partner violence in certain marginalized communities”, “domestic violence within Black, brown, Native, LGBTQ+ communities and those with disabilities are not reported on with the quality nor the frequency that abuse against white women is reported”. This proposal will ensure that all individuals who experience/report domestic violence in the City of Minneapolis have access to and are connected with resources.


Evidence

This proposal is supported by strong empirical data. The City of Minneapolis currently has 1 Domestic Violence Navigator. In 2023, to date, the 1 Domestic Violence Navigator has made 710 contacts with domestic violence survivors, and 40% of those contacts have been referred to a local domestic violence agency for additional follow up, support, and services. The Domestic Violence Navigator has also filed 103 protections orders, 80 other court related documents, and has attended 12 court hearings.

Performance

Performance metrics will be determined at a future date.

Department of Neighborhood Safety: Senior Project Manager

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Good Governance

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 1


Summary

The Council approves $159,799 in ongoing General Fund for the Department of Neighborhood Safety to fund one Senior Project manager.


Description

Neighborhood Safety noted in the their budget presentation that the department relies on staff from other administrative departments, including Health, to support several core functions, including in contracts/procurement and RFP processes. This additional FTE is critical for expanding capacity within the Department of Neighborhood Safety and ensuring the department achieves an appropriate staffing balance. This position will enable Neighborhood Safety to successfully manage a growing workload, including additional contracting, and RFP responsibilities associated with new programming supported by the public safety aid provided by the State. As the department continues striving for an effective staffing balance, this Senior Project Manager position will help avoid inefficient repurposing of existing positions within the department and reduce the department’s reliance on other departments. This position will also build capacity within the Neighborhood Safety department to manage existing projects. Expanded capacity will improve efficiencies throughout the department which will in turn benefit the community through effective partnership, improved coordination, and continuous improvement. Improved service coordination is a priority for the department and the City. This additional FTE will support that priority and create better alignment of systems and staffing.


This proposal will have direct impacts on City staff and indirect impacts on community members. The indirect impact on community members will disproportionately benefit communities of color and specified neighborhoods. The Neighborhood Safety department’s work aims to decrease factors that put community members at risk of involvement with violence and/or increase factors that protects community members against involvement with violence. Violence has roots in social, economic, political, and cultural conditions, it cyclical, and it takes an unequal toll on communities of color and specific neighborhoods. The department’s work to disrupt, reduce, and eliminate cycles of violence through a public health approach require collaboration and coordination to address the root causes of violence, which include income inequality; lack of safe, stable, affordable housing; under-resourced public services; community disinvestment; oppression; and racism. Communities of color are disproportionately impacted by these root causes, and the expanded capacity provided by this position will enable the department to develop, test, and implement effective strategies for protecting community members against violence.


Finally, this proposal advances several existing and emerging strategic plans including the Comprehensive Plan, and SREAP. It also sets the groundwork for emerging public safety initiatives including the Minneapolis Safe and Thriving Communities Report and the potential development of Comprehensive Community Safety Centers.


Equity

This proposal is expected to have a positive impact on reducing racial disparities. Programs and initiatives administered through Neighborhood Safety that prevent and interrupt violence are already making positive contributions in communities of color through strategic partnerships. In 2022, the Blueprint Approved Institute project provided wrap-around services to Latine survivors of gender-based violence, Black-centered parental education programs, and increased youth access to employment. In 2022, 467 community activities were completed and nearly 16,000 community members were engaged through the Violence Prevention Fund. In 2023, Violence Interrupters made over 80,000 contacts and completed 367 mediations. Expanded capacity presents an opportunity to pilot innovative public safety projects administered by the Neighborhood Safety department. This proposal could also impact communities with cultural and linguistic diversity by enabling the department to coordinate and deploy resources throughout the city.


Evidence

Existing evidence shows that the City’s biggest challenge is not a lack of services and initiatives but a lack of coordination and misalignment of systems for monitoring and continuous improvement in preparation to leverage partnerships and funding. This proposal is expected to address this challenge within the Neighborhood Safety department by building capacity among staff and partner organizations.


Performance

Goal: Increase capacity of the Neighborhood Safety Department by allocating one Senior Project Manager to the department.


Objectives:

  • Expand the department’s capacity to effectively manage projects
  • improve service coordination and better align systems and staffing

Metric: Reduction in Neighborhood Safety’s reliance on other departments for central functions.

Department of Neighborhood Safety: Cultural District Safety Ambassadors

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Community Safety & Police Reform

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 0


Summary

The Council approves $3,000,000 in one-time General Fund dollars for the Neighborhood Safety Department to develop, implement and deploy an ambassador pilot program in the city’s seven Cultural Districts, as well as Great Streets eligible sections of Uptown, Dinkytown, Mill District and East Hennepin. This assistance will include, but not be limited to, technical assistance and research and evaluation to inform future investments in crime prevention through environmental design and other data-driven alternatives.


Description

This investment to the Neighborhood Safety department budget will provide capacity to develop and implement an ambassador pilot program in the city’s seven Cultural Districts in 2024. The Minneapolis Cultural Districts are an endeavor to redress historic redlining and economic exclusion within the city based on race, class, and immigration status. Eligible properties in the Cultural Districts must be within a Metropolitan Council-defined area of concentrated poverty, be rooted in communities with a significant number of BIPOC residents and/or a rich cultural and/or linguistic identity, have a goods and services corridor, and be accessible by walking and accessible by public transportation.


The Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District (DID) has modeled several successful initiatives and collaborations to improve safety in downtown Minneapolis, including an ambassador’s program and a Livability Team. Some ambassadors work to keep downtown clean while others work to provide natural surveillance and the livability team works to connect people to resources and services. Following up on those successes, this pilot program intends to partner with community-based organizations that will work along the city’s Cultural Districts. It will be administered through an RFP process to deliver comparable, upstream, and preventative safety services to those areas. It will be modeled after the Minneapolis Downtown Improvement District (DID)’s several successful initiatives and collaborations to improve safety in downtown Minneapolis. This pilot program will prioritize the needs of the city’s Cultural Districts recognizing each district may have similar safety challenges but varying capacities, and each can adopt tailored, culturally relevant safety solutions. The pilot program will be delivered through increased capacity for the city’s Cultural Districts through coordinated service delivery; highly visible, unarmed, friendly safety presence; reduced calls for service to Minneapolis Police Department; and increased livability along the corridors. Residents, businesses, and visitors of the seven Cultural Districts will be served by this work of violence interruption and de-escalation, connecting residents to services and treatment, and helping with cleaning and wayfinding in the corridors. The research and evaluation of the pilot program may inform future public safety investments.

Equity

This proposal will reduce racial disparities (anecdotal/no data) by continuing violence interruption and de-escalation work, connecting residents to services and treatment within the respective corridors. This work is intended to reduce arrest, incarceration, and racial disparities by developing a more effective, equitable, and non-punitive system of response to the problems associated with unmanaged behavioral health needs.  


Evidence

DID’s 2022 Annual Report highlights the success of its various initiatives, including serving over 70,000 pedestrians, removing nearly 37,000 bags of trash and over 3,600 bags of recycling removed, and the removal of over 8,400 graffiti tags in 2022, among other accomplishments. DID’s report also included brief case studies from various activation efforts, including transforming underutilized public space into a hub of creative engagement, and described how the organization’s Safety Communications Center, Ambassadors, and outreach groups played a role in City-led initiative to reduce violent crime.


Performance

Goal: Develop and implement public safety pilot programming in 2024 and deploy ambassador programs within the Cultural Districts


Objectives:

  • Develop and implement public safety pilot programming
  • Funds deployed to the community.
  • Community Driven collaborative solutions with cultural corridors

Metrics:

  • Number of project applications
  • Number of projects funded
  • Number of ambassadors working per corridor
  • Number of incidents reported and resolved
  • Number of projects that provided positive area activation
  • Other metrics to be developed with project progress

Department of Neighborhood Safety: Collaborative Public Safety Strategies

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Community Safety & Police Reform

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 0


Proposal detail and background

The Council approves $600,000 in one-time General Funds for Neighborhood Safety to develop and implement the Collaborative Public Safety Strategies program to reduce gun violence.


Description of the change

This funding increases the budget for the Neighborhood Safety Department to develop and implement a Collaborative Public Safety Strategies program to reduce gun violence. These funds will be used by the Neighborhood Safety Department to invest $600,000 in collaborative, community-driven, public-safety strategies in the areas of Cleveland and Folwell in North Minneapolis and East Phillips/Midtown Phillips in South Minneapolis. This innovative initiative will provide technical and financial resources for residents and business owners of these areas, and the community-based organizations that serve them, to collaborate on public-safety interventions that would best improve public safety there and reduce gun violence.


The City of Minneapolis 2022 Gun Violence Overview shows why these neighborhoods are in dire need of community intervention on public safety. In 2022, both neighborhoods had high levels of firearm and gun crime-related calls for service. Neighbors in these neighborhoods would also benefit in community-based solutions to reduce gun violence.


These funds will allow Neighborhood Safety to run a clear and transparent procurement process and select community-based organizations who can collaborate on public safety interventions in these areas.


This program will endeavor to impact public safety and interrupt patterns of violence or harmful behavior in the communities most impacted by gun violence and youth violence. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2022), some groups have higher rates of a firearm injury than others. Men account for 86% of all victims of firearm death and 87% of nonfatal firearm injuries. Rates of firearm violence also vary by age and race/ethnicity. Firearm homicide rates are highest among teens and young adults 15-34 years of age and Black or African American, American Indian, or Alaska Native, and Hispanic or Latino populations. Firearm suicide rates are highest among adults 75 years of age and older and American Indian or Alaska Native and non-Hispanic white populations.


Additionally, in a January 2021 statistical brief, the U.S. Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics addressed the issue of the race and ethnicity of perpetrators of violent crimes in 2018. Based on data compiled by the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, it found that while Black people make up 13% of the U.S. population, they were 33% of persons arrested for nonfatal violent crimes. Similarly, Hispanics comprised 18% of the U.S. population and 21% of those arrested for severe nonfatal violent crimes. White peoples, who are 60% of the population, were 46% of persons arrested for nonfatal violent crimes and 39% of those arrested for severe nonfatal violent crimes.


The following are demographics of shooting victims for 2021 (as reported in MPD's Information Management System):

  • 81% Male and 19% Female
  • 83% Black
  • 11% White (Includes Hispanic based on RMS Methodology)
  • 3% Unknown, Native American: 2%, Asian: 1%
  • Top two age groups: 17-21 (24%), 27-31 (21%)
  • City of residence: 59% Minneapolis, 41% other cities

According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2020), the African American community only represents 12.4 % of the state of Minnesota. The data is clear that Minneapolis' Black and indigenous people of color communities experience gun violence differently than white communities.


Equity impacts and results

Will reduce racial disparities (anecdotal/no data)  .


Evidence

There is national and local evidence on data-driven public health approaches to public safety, as cited in the 2017 City of Minneapolis program for Collaborative Public Safety Strategies.


Performance metrics

Goal: Improve public safety in North Minneapolis and in South Minneapolis.  


Objective:

  • Invest in collaborative, community-driven, public-safety strategies in locations with high levels of youth violence.
  • Provide technical and financial resources for residents and business owners of these areas, and the community-based organizations that serve them, to collaborate on upstream public-safety interventions that would best improve public safety there.

Metric:

  • Number of Neighborhood Associations and groups, organizations, service providers, youth engagement organizations, and places of worship engaged.
  • Number of Youth engaged disaggregated by race.
  • Number of residents engaged.
  • Crime, Livability, and public safety data in area during duration of project.

Department of Neighborhood Safety: Elliot Park Community Safety Initiatives

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Community Safety & Police Reform

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 0


Proposal detail and background

The Council approves $200,000 in one-time General Fund for Neighborhood Safety Department to conduct community safety initiatives in neighborhoods where residents and business owners have been impacted by increased violence and loitering. The funds will be used to address issues in neighborhoods plagued by crime, public intoxication, and violence.


Description of the change

The Elliot Park neighborhood has been experiencing both livability and nuisance issues, as well as violent crimes, including a mass shooting that injured five teenage boys and three adults in August 2023. The Council office in the area hosted multiple safety meetings to hear from the community and was abundantly clear that the situation is extremely precarious and requires additional interventions.


Residents have begun working together, along with representatives of business, non-profits, and academic institutions in the area, to address the problems in a coordinated effort.


Additionally, below is some data related to the need in Elliot Park:


  • The neighborhood consists of 41% people of color
  • Factors that indicate vulnerability of stable housing and/or basic needs met in Elliot Park:
  • 45% of households are cost-burdened
  • 51% of renter households are cost-burdened
  • 48% of households make $35,000 or less in household income
  • 27% of households are below poverty level

There are around a dozen homeless shelters in, or within 1-2 miles of, the Elliot Park Neighborhood that serve people who will have close access to nutritious meals, healthcare, intensive case management services, and chronic disease prevention resources.


Equity impacts and results

This funding will not reduce or increase racial disparities.

Performance metrics

The funds will be used to combat crime, public intoxication, and violence in neighborhoods most affected by the issue. The goal is to reduce the rising levels of violence and drug use related crimes in those neighborhoods.

Department of Neighborhood Safety: Lake Street Public Safety Coordinator Pilot

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Community Safety & Police Reform

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 0


Proposal detail and background

The Council approves $300,000 in one-time General Fund for Neighborhood Safety to develop and implement a Lake Street Cultural District Public Safety Coordinator Pilot . 


Description of the change

The Neighborhood Safety Department will implement a plan to improve the coordination of law enforcement and non-law enforcement responses along Lake Street. This program will connect residents and businesses to services while also piloting area activation to address crime and livability concerns. This is a pilot program that may be expanded to other areas of the City in future years.


Based on MN Compass data, the neighborhoods along this corridor range from 39.5% to 73.5% people of color with up to 47.8% having a household income of less than $35,000. The area is one of the most densely populated areas as well as one of the most diverse in the City of Minneapolis.


The Council Office has engaged with the Lake Street Council and Lake Street Green Way Partnership on way to best coordinate the City’s public safety tools on the corridor. This idea emerged from those conversations.


Equity impacts and results

Will reduce racial disparities (anecdotal/no data)  


The goal is to improve the coordination of law enforcement and non-law enforcement responses along Lake Street which will allow programs like LEAD, violence interrupters, and others to reduce arrest, incarceration, and racial disparities, by developing a more effective, equitable, and non-punitive system of response to crime and livability concerns along the East Lake Street corridor.  

Performance metrics

Goal:  Develop and implement a Lake Street Cultural District Public Safety Coordinator pilot

Objective: Improved coordination of law enforcement and non-law enforcement responses along Lake Street to improve crime and livability concerns 

Metric:

  • Improved communication of response and services 
  • Number of residents connected to treatment, services, and housing 
  • A measurable improvement of crime and livability concerns along the East Lake Street Corridor 

Department of Neighborhood Safety: Continuation of Violence Prevention Activities

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Community Safety & Police Reform

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 0

Proposal detail and background

Through the 2023-24 biennial budget process last year, the Mayor and Council included $2.375 million in ongoing funding starting in 2024 and $1 million in one-time funding in 2024 to continue the violence prevention work initially expanded using American Recue Plan Act (ARPA) funding. ARPA appropriations expire at the end of 2023, so these General Fund dollars will allow Neighborhood Safety to maintain this work.


Description of the change

This item provides ongoing funding for four violence prevention initiatives:


  • MinneapolUS Strategic Outreach Initiative, $1 million
  • Group Violence Intervention Technical Services, $125,000
  • Adolescent-specific Group Violence Intervention, $250,000
  • Community Trauma and De-escalation Initiative, $900,000
  • Violence Prevention Fund, $1,000,000 (one-time)

This proposal addresses the Mayoral priority of Public Safety. Effectively addressing violence requires a comprehensive approach that considers the complexity of the issue and works both upstream and downstream. The Office of Violence Prevention uses a public health lens to operationalize that approach.


ARPA funding has allowed for development of new initiatives, including: 1) Community Trauma Initiative; 2) Adolescent-specific Group Violence Intervention. Without City budget investment in those items for 2024 and beyond, they would cease after 2023.


Additionally, ARPA funding has played an essential role in increasing reach and availability of core OVP initiatives. That includes: 1) the Violence Prevention Fund, for which we recently received requests for more than ten times the amount of available funding for community-driven violence prevention activities; 2) MinneapolUS Strategic Outreach Initiative. This program currently serves a limited number of neighborhoods in the city .


Funds will support contractual services existing contractors and/or new contractors.


Equity impacts and results

This program will reduce racial disparities and is supported by rigorous, data-driven evidence.


The burden of violence is not distributed equally. In 2020, 81% of shooting victims in Minneapolis were Black, 10% white (including Hispanic people), and 4% Native American. In 2021 in Minneapolis, 86% of homicide victims in situations where race was known were non-white and/or Hispanic and 75% Black. While individual factors can contribute to risk of violence, individual-level factors are not what drives disproportionality. Rather, the disproportionate burden of violence impacting People of Color is tied to complex societal-level conditions deeply rooted in structural inequities like redlining and disinvestment, discrimination, lack of economic opportunities, high concentrations of poverty, and under-resourced public services (https://publichealth.jhu.edu/departments/health-policy-and-management/research-and-practice/center-for-gun-violence-solutions/solutions/strategies-to-reduce-community-gun-violence; https://efsgv.org/learn/type-of-gun-violence/community-gun-violence/; https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/youthviolence/riskprotectivefactors.html#Risk%20Factors; https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306540).


OVP initiatives acknowledge that and are meant to address complex structural conditions that can increase likelihood of violence. Participants—the majority of whom are likely to identify as BIPOC—have increased access to resources and services that can help mitigate some harm caused by longstanding structural inequities. Some OVP initiatives work to create community cohesion and other supports that can buffer against the harmful impacts of structural inequities. And, some OVP initiatives support skill development and capacity building, which can help increase the amount of support services available to community and create economic opportunities for predominantly BIPOC-led organizations.


Performance metrics

The Adolescent-Specific Group Violence Intervention and Group Violence Intervention Technical Assistance funding would address the following program goal and associated metric:


Goal: People in Minneapolis experience a decrease in factors that put them at risk for involvement with violence and/or an increase in factors that protect against involvement with violence.


Objective: People participating in the Group Violence Intervention strategy are connected to resources to support exiting the cycle of violence.


Metric:

  • Percentage of individuals that participate in a custom notification or call-in who enroll in GVI services.
  • Rate of GVI participants that perceive that services resulting from the program brought them closer to exiting the cycle of violence.

The Violence Prevention Fund would address the following program goal and associated metric:

Goal: Community organizations and partners have capacity and resources to effectively engage in work to prevent violence using public health-oriented approaches. ​


Objective: The Violence Prevention Fund increases funding for community-driven violence prevention projects.


Metric: Number of projects in Minneapolis that use public health approaches to violence prevention/intervention.


The Community Trauma Initiative funding would broadly impact the program goal of “People in Minneapolis experience a decrease in factors that put them at risk for involvement with violence and/or an increase in factors that protect against involvement with violence.” There is not currently an objective or metric associated with the initiative, as it is new work. We will be working with our partners in the Health Department’s Research and Evaluation team to develop ways to monitor and evaluate this initiative.

Department of Neighborhood Safety: Transit Safety Coordinators

Program: Neighborhood Safety

Priority: Community Safety & Police Reform

Fund: General Fund

FTEs: 2


Proposal detail and background

The Council approves $720,000 one-time in the General fund for Neighborhood Safety to coordinate public safety measures along transit stations and public transit.


Description of the change

This budget proposal uses $720,000 of the State’s $19,000,000 one-time Public Safety Aid to create two temporary positions to fund safety coordination work in the Neighborhood Safety Department. In recent years, our community has experienced a rise in public safety concerns in and around Transit Stations in Minneapolis. These public safety challenges put riders and workers in harm’s way and create livability challenges for community members in the surrounding areas. Efforts to address this, like temporarily closing Transit Stations or keeping heat turned off during winter months, haven’t proven to be meaningful or permanent solutions. In fact, they’ve sometimes created new challenges or exacerbated existing ones.


Minneapolis is home to 79 transit stations. Though Metro Transit owns and operates them, a coordinated, multi-jurisdictional approach is needed to create public safety for these sites and their surroundings throughout Minneapolis. For example, at the peak in March 2023, there were around 400 officer-initiated and more than 350 dispatched calls for service to the Lake Street Midtown transit station, as well as almost 250 reported crimes. With a multi-jurisdictional coordinated community relations plan in effect, those numbers steadily declined to the point that by October 2023, there were approximately 50 officer-initiated and 50 dispatched calls for service, and a roughly 80% drop in reported crimes. Similar efforts are in place at the Lake Street-35W Transit Station and the Uptown Transit Station.


Since these examples only address three of the many transit stations throughout the City, there is enough of a need to justify having additional resources for transit safety coordination via temporary Transit Safety Coordinators, which will bring stakeholders together to address safety issues at Transit stations and stops throughout the City. Metro Transit has an equivalent staff role who serves as the point person for this work on their end. It would be more efficient and effective to have capacity at the City to coordinate with their counterparts at Metro Transit in a more comprehensive way rather than having several Council offices coordinating with them about a patchwork of disparate sites throughout the City.


Equity impacts and results

This proposal will reduce racial disparities (anecdotal/no evidence).


Transit riders are disproportionately Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC). Safety issues at Transit Stations are often concentrated in neighborhoods with higher-than-average BIPOC populations. Many Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) high school students ride transit to and from school. Safety challenges in and around Transit Stations can be a contributing factor in decreased ridership, which risks service cuts. This in turn harms transit-dependent residents the most. Creating a comprehensive public safety plan to improve safety and accessibility for transit users and workers, along with improving livability for the surrounding community. Since the negative impacts of ongoing safety problems at transit stations disproportionately impact Minneapolis’s BIPOC communities, both transit riders and people in surrounding neighborhoods, a concerted effort to improve safety issues at Transit Stations will have a positive impact on the City’s BIPOC communities. Significant numbers of people with physical disabilities use or are dependent on public transit; efforts to improve safety at transit stations will positively impact transit users and residents of neighborhoods surrounding transit stations with physical disabilities as well.


Evidence

Metro Transit compiled and provided data about the dramatic decline in police calls for service and crimes at the Lake Street-Midtown Transit Station and the Lake Street-35W Transit Station as a result of the collaborative work done with Council offices and other community partners. While data is not yet available for the work around the Uptown Transit Station, initial indications are that the collaborative work there is also similarly producing positive results.


Performance metrics

The Adolescent-Specific Group Violence Intervention and Group Violence Intervention Technical Assistance funding would address the following program goal and associated metric:


Goal: Establishing two temporary Transit Safety Coordinator positions to address public safety and livability issues at and around public transit stops in Minneapolis.


Objective: Build on the pilots from the Ward 9 and Ward 10 Offices to bring together stakeholders across governmental agencies, nonprofit partners, and community and neighborhood groups to build a comprehensive transit safety plan for all 79 Transit Stations across the City.


Metric: Reduction in dispatched calls for service and other metrics established by the temporary Transit Safety Coordinators in the Neighborhood Safety Department.

Administrative adjustments and transfers


Reclassifications

The following position classification changes to existing budgeted positions within the Neighborhood Safety Department are reflected in the 2024 budget:


  • Director Office of Violence Prevention reclassified to Neighborhood Safety Director

  • Crime Prevention Specialist reclassified to Office of Violence Prevention Interagency Coordinator

  • Crime Prevention Specialist reclassified to Project Coordinator


Administrative FTE adjustments

The following position changes are reflected in the 2024 budget for a net decrease of 0.65 FTEs:


  • Increased FTE count by 0.5 FTE through administrative add, which was offset by reducing the department's non-personnel budget.

  • Decreased FTE count by 1.15 FTEs due to the end of grant funding and to correct split funding for FTEs across two departments following the government restructure.