Civil Rights


Mission statement

Enforce Minneapolis Code of Ordinances Title 7 (non-discrimination); Title 9, Chapter 172 (civilian police review authority); Title 16, Chapter 423 (small and underutilized business programs); Title 23, Chapter 6 (prevailing wage); Title 2, Chapter 40 (workplace regulations); and to promote understanding of civil rights among residents, business and government.

Our people

Organization chart showing titles of leadership at Civil rights as of 2021

Programs and divisions



Purpose and context

The Complaint Investigation Division (CID) is required by City Ordinance to enforce the City’s antidiscrimination laws and policies by investigating complaints of discrimination. Also, through a work-sharing agreement with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the City serves as a Fair Employment Practice Agency (FEPA), investigating employment discrimination dual-filed claims and/or cases transferred from the EEOC. This program also administers an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Program to resolve complaints that allege discrimination and provide staff support to the Minneapolis Civil Rights Commission.


Services provided

Investigating Discrimination

The Minneapolis Civil Rights Ordinance was created to protect people from discrimination. Discrimination is a serious accusation. As such, there is a high bar for determining when discrimination has occurred. Investigators conduct a legal analysis of the case to ensure neutrality. The guidelines for the analysis are known as prima facie elements. Every protected area and protected basis have their own unique elements. Culmination of the legal analysis is known as a Determination, which is public in nature.

Case Resolutions

  • ADR Settlement – An outcome where a case is resolved by way of an Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) process (i.e. mediation).
  • Determination – A written legal analysis generated after a thorough review of the facts, the possible outcome of which may be described in one of three ways:
    • Dismissal = lacks merit
    • No Probable Cause (NPC) = lacks merit
    • Probable Cause (PC) = merit
  • Transfer – An outcome where a case is sent to an alternative agency for investigation (i.e. where there is no jurisdiction over the case).
  • Withdrawal – Describes a circumstance where the Complainant requests that the investigation be concluded before a final outcome is reached.

CID investigates a wide variety of discrimination complaints including 14 legal areas for 13 protected classes. Most frequent legal areas include employment, public accommodations, and housing. Most frequent protected classes include race, disability, gender, national origin, and age.


Race equity impacts

Many communities have lost trust in government due to frequent discrimination. However, by building strategic partnerships and increasing resident knowledge, this trend can be reversed. CID is in an optimal position to bring relief to multiple groups that experience discrimination but are not in the habit of reporting.

In the course of doing this work, CID has made significant efforts to improve the ability to capture reliable data, thereby increasing our understanding of the challenges faced by communities disparately impacted by discrimination. As a result, CID is also in a unique position to identify trends within the City that may help to inform policy development towards addressing systemic issues of discrimination.


Purpose and context

The Civil Rights Equity Division (CRED), formally the Employment Equity Division, was created as a direct result of the racial disparities across Minneapolis, including the gaps in employment, purchasing, and community representation. CRED plays an important role in achieving the Department’s purpose in preventing and prohibiting all discriminatory practices in the City of Minneapolis by providing leadership to many of the Departments non-enforcement efforts.

CRED leads and provides support to internal and Citywide efforts to develop policies, practices, and strategic investments to reverse racial disparity trends, eliminate institutional racism, and ensure that outcomes and opportunities for all people are no longer predictable by race.


Services provided

Management of Racial Equity Projects

CRED provides leadership, project management, and staff support to internal and cross departmental racial equity efforts. Some recent and ongoing projects include:

  • Supplier Diversity
  • S+REAP Priority Area: Diverse Spend
  • Disparities Study
  • Citywide Response to Anti-Asian Racism during COVID-19
  • Census Experience: How the Census is a Civil Rights Issue
  • Embodied Anti-Racism Community of Practice Leadership
  • Providing Facilitation, Training, and Coaching

Program Management

CRED manages Urban Scholars, a regional effort to close the employment gap. Staff manage the City of Minneapolis’ program and administer programming at a dozen partner agencies. Urban Scholars envisions an inclusive and equitable workforce made up of diverse leadership that reflects our community and works to intentionally connect students and organizations in pursuit of an equitable workforce.

The Urban Scholars Program is focused on two interwoven strands of work: one, engaging Urban Scholars in opportunities for personal and professional growth necessary for navigating current and future employment opportunities; two, building capacity for organizations to offer meaningful work experiences and to become more equitable in their recruitment, hiring, support, and inclusion of interns and employees from all racial and ethnic backgrounds.


Race equity impacts

From the beginning, CRED has approached all its efforts by applying a racial equity lens. The questions put forth in the newly released Racial Equity Impact Assessment by the Office of Race and Equity, originated in this division and has been central to CRED’s work and are integrated into daily conversations and decision making.

CRED is often brought into projects to provide this analysis, but the impacts are not easily measurable, as we are rarely owners of the project or a part of the process long term. However, consistent use of this method in those programs we do run has resulted in:


  • Urban Scholars programming being managed by alumni of the program.
  • 500+ positions to majority BIPOC students in predominately white institutions
  • 1 in 3 City of Minneapolis Urban Scholars have been hired into full or part time positions with the City after completing the Urban Scholars Program
  • $1.33 Million to City of Minneapolis program participants, a demographic with one of the highest rates of unemployment
  • Increased trust between traditionally marginalized and excluded populations and government. Demonstrated by rate of return, alumni engagement, participation in boards and commission, and an increase in the number of participants now interested in working in the public sector.

Purpose and context

The Contract Compliance Division (CCD) ensures that City of Minneapolis procurement of construction and development services, commodities and supplies, and professional and technical services includes and provides opportunities for women, minorities, and low-income workers and businesses. CCD also ensures that workers on construction and development projects are paid in accordance with prevailing wage laws. This division monitors and ensures compliance in four primary program areas that affect the general fund: Affirmative Action, Minority and Women Business Inclusion, Low Income Residents and Business Inclusion, and Prevailing Wage Compliance.


Services provided

Department staff monitor construction projects to ensure contractors commit to using female and BIPOC workers, adhere to their commitments, and make efforts to recruit, hire, and train female and BIPOC workers.


City construction and development contracted projects over $175,000 are monitored to ensure contractors commit to subcontract women-owned and minority-owned businesses via the Small and Underutilized Business Program (SUBP).


Race equity impacts

The Disparity Study for Minneapolis directly addresses how the City can more equitably spend its dollars with M/WBEs. Both quantitative and qualitative data was collected from over 2,000 business firms who not only discussed barriers to doing business with the City, but also with starting and running businesses in the City.

The construction manager as advisor method of procurement/contracting does allow the City more control over inclusion in the process, but only by dedicating resources to ensure staff are able to effectively review bids and proposals will the City see this process benefiting underutilized businesses.


Purpose and context

The Labor Standards Enforcement Division (LSED) oversees investigations and compliance with the City’s Workplace Regulations ordinances, which include Sick and Safe Time, Municipal Minimum Wage, Wage Theft Prevention, and Freelance Worker Protections ordinances. The City’s labor standards affect all employees and employers across the city. The work of the division is performed in support of the City-wide goal of One Minneapolis with a focus on resident safety, well-being and prosperity. The Division also provides staff support to the Workplace Advisory Group, a diverse group of employee, small employer, large employer, organized labor, and community stakeholders that focus on workplace issues and provide feedback regarding implementation of the city’s labor standards.


Services provided

Many City regulations exist to mitigate risks in a general sense across entire communities. In comparison, a labor standards violation means that a specific harm has occurred and money is owed to individual people. Often the aggrieved individuals are workers without other legal recourse.


The City’s labor standards ordinances charge LSED with complaint-based enforcement through an administrative process of fact finding and negotiation. Most investigations involve at least an audit of payroll records. LSED investigators spend several months per case - depending on its complexity- from inquiry, intake, investigation, negotiation, and resolution of a legal claim.


In addition, the Division is tasked to undertake broad communications and deep outreach to inform thousands of businesses and tens of thousands of workers about new workers’ rights. A co-enforcement model of enforcement in collaboration with local workers centers helps ensure that the most vulnerable low wage workers are empowered with the knowledge and wherewithal to assert their rights without reliance on the City’s very limited resources.


LSED has continued on-going collaboration and consulting with the Office of the Mayor, City Council Offices, City Coordinator’s Office, CPED, Health, 311, NCR, and Communications. These collaborations are been immensely valuable in providing communication, messaging, and public outreach.


Race equity impacts

The adoption of the Sick and Safe Time, Minimum Wage, Wage Theft, and Freelance Worker ordinances were explicit strategies to address economic disparities across the City. Much of the data is readily available and has been reported extensively; 41% of all black workers and 54% of all Latino workers - and their 71,000 families - earned less than $15 per hour at the time of ordinance passage. This compares with only 17% of all white workers in Minneapolis.


41% of all workers in Minneapolis previously had no access, whatsoever, to paid time off for any purpose, leaving workers of color disproportionately exposed during a public health emergency such as COVID-19. Black and Latinx workers are, respectively, greater than three and four times more likely than whites to be victimized by wage theft. In short, enforcement of the City’s labor standards ensures some measure of access to justice where very little would otherwise exist.

Increasing staffing also helps the City serve our small business communities in ways that sets small businesses up for success.


Purpose and context

The Office of Police Conduct Review (OPCR) processes police conduct complaints in a fair manner with a civilian-sworn leadership model of oversight. OPCR utilizes a hybrid review panel of community members and police officers to issue recommendations. The OPCR provides staff support to the Police Conduct Oversight Commission (Commission), an all civilian commission that recommends policy and training that is positioned to change a culture, build community trust and have a lasting impact on the practice of police oversight. The Commission provides transparency, citizen engagement, and meaningful participation related to police conduct by advising on police policy, auditing OPCR cases, and engaging the community in discussions of police procedure. The ultimate goal is to improve community policing by fostering trust between all populations of the city of Minneapolis and the Minneapolis Police Department through accountability measures across its various functions.


Services provided

The Office of Police Conduct Review (OPCR) ensures police conduct complaints are handled through layers of civilian oversight to hold the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD) accountable to all populations of the City. OPCR’s case work is done by civilian investigators, a body worn camera analyst, and a director. The cornerstone of our work is to improve community policing and ensure the effective operations of the City’s civilian oversight mechanism. All cases are initially screened by a civilian investigator and complainants may request to have a civilian investigate their cases. A civilian director makes decisions on the case route jointly with the Commander of Internal Affairs. A review panel made of Council/Mayor-appointed civilians and police lieutenants then recommends merit or no merit at the conclusion of each investigation. OPCR also may compel testimony from officers during case investigations. The outcome of compelled testimony in an investigation can lead to an officer’s discipline, up to and including discharge. The ability to compel testimony is very similar to subpoena power.

OPCR has full and direct access to MPD data and a significant amount of their results are available to the public. OPCR staff has their own accounts in MPD databases and do not have to ask the police department for body worn camera footage, police reports, GPS logs, employee data, and a host of other information. Most cities across the nation do not have this level of public access to data related to police misconduct cases.


The OPCR mechanism allows civilians to have significant control over police misconduct investigations conducted by both sworn and civilian investigators and the ability to have a strong voice in case outcomes and shaping the MPD policy and procedure.


Race equity impacts

The work of OPCR is critical in addressing the Results goals of Protecting Rights and Promoting Justice and Meeting Customer and Community Needs. Cases of police misconduct continue to increase and disproportionately impact people of color, people who identify as LGBTQA/ I, and those people with mental health issues or are in a time of crisis. Complainants identifying as Black filed more complaints about use of force than all other demographics combined. Further, complainants identifying as people of color requested civilian complaint investigators at nearly 3x the rate of police investigators. There are currently 3x more police investigators that civilian investigators.

Complaints are predominately filed by people of color and there is also significant underreporting related to police misconduct. According to the 2016 Resident Survey, 50% of residents in Camden and Phillips neighborhoods reported having contact with the police in the last 12 months compared to only 25% of most other communities. Forty-four percent of those who experienced discrimination while receiving City Services reported it was while interacting with police. The rate was almost 10% higher for those living in Near North. So, while cases are up, there is still evidence of underreporting overall.

OPCR provides staff support to the Police Conduct Oversight Commission (PCOC). The PCOC gives residents from across the City of Minneapolis an opportunity to voice their concerns regarding policing issues. OPCR completes research and study projects proposed by the community that are approved by the PCOC to provide recommendations to MPD on how to improve policing for all populations of the City of Minneapolis. These recommendations resulted in substantial change including a role in the co-responder program, the conduct on licensed premises ordinance change and review panel, domestic violence response improvements, and other much needed change in MPD. OPCR also has its own auditing function that led to strict regulations about police conduct regarding pre-hospital sedation in arrests.

The Office of Administration & Policy (OAP) is responsible for the management and oversight of administrative operations for the Department of Civil Rights.


These efforts include:

  • Development and management of an annual budget
  • Workforce planning and development initiatives
  • Facilities management and continuity of operations planning
  • Process improvement and strategic planning processes
  • Management of public data and information requests

Additionally, OAP serves as the policy oversight mechanism of the department to ensure that we apply a consistent process and approach to any work involving creating or modifying an ordinance, resolution, or policy in the City.

One of the primary goals of the Office of Administration and Policy is to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of operations for the Department of Civil Rights. Centralization of administrative, policy, and external coordination responsibilities is intended to increase the capacity for other divisions to redirect towards their primary programs in order to provide the highest level of responsive and impactful services to City residents.


2022 Council Adopted change items


Civil Rights - Core Service Rebuilding

Program: Contract Compliance

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 1.0

Proposal detail and background

The Council approves $132,000 in ongoing funding to support the Director of Contract Compliance position.


To meet budget reduction goals for 2020 and 2021, Civil Rights elected to freeze multiple vacant positions. This decision was made so that the impact to existing staff and work would be minimal. However, as the work and operations continue a return to “normal,” it is critical that we return this position to provide leadership, guidance, and oversight to the Contract Compliance Division.


When this position was frozen, the Director of Labor Standards graciously stepped in to provide interim management of this division, along with critical support from senior division staff, but continuation of this arrangement indefinitely puts immense strain on the available support for staff of each division.


Description of the change

This proposal would return the Director of Contract Compliance position to an active status. This position could be hired by February of 2022 and fully funded in the following years.


Equity impacts and results

The equity impact of reductions to positions within Contract Compliance has a direct impact on marginalized communities, BIPOC/WBE businesses, and low wage workers in Minneapolis.


Contract Compliance has a direct impact on BIPOC/WBE businesses and employee inclusion rates on city funded contracts. The forfeiture of this position was addressed by merging oversight of Contract Compliance work with our Labor Standards Enforcement Division. The hope was that by merging these labor and inclusion focused divisions, the impact of losing positions in this area can be mitigated as best as possible. While we believe this arrangement was able to accomplish our goals and provide some stability during a period of uncertainly, the return of this position is critical in reestablishing a dedicated division director to provide their vision and specific skillset to the work of CCD.

Reestablishing a Director for this group that can be focused solely on contract compliance work is a necessary element to support innovation and improvement in division operations. It also provides a dedicated Director for CCD staff to field questions, identify opportunities professional development, and serve as a support structure to help push work through.

Civil Rights - Office Administrator

Program: Administration

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 1.0


Proposal detail and background

The Council approves the creation of 1.0 FTE and $109,000 in ongoing funding for an Office Administrator.


Current administrative support is leveraged from division administrative staff. No single staff member is able to support everything needed to oversee department administrative work. This also takes division staff resources away from processing complaints and responding to community members with questions.


As the scope of work and size of the department grow, so does the work needed to manage the administrative operations. At the same time, there is a corresponding rise in the workload for division support staff to manage case intake, schedule/coordinate mediations, panels, and other meetings, and serve as primary public contact points for division scope of responsibility.


Description of the change

An Office Administrator would provide a single staff contact for the department to manage purchasing, supplies/IT/facilities needs, travel arrangements, event logistics coordination, and serve as the main public point of contact for the department.


The enforcement divisions of Civil Rights oversee areas including allegations of discrimination, labor standards violations, police misconduct, and equitable and inclusive contracting with the City. The common link between each division is that the work is intended to provide a recourse to discriminatory, unjust, or inequitable actions. Data also indicates that these actions continue to impact people of color, LBGTQA/I, and BIPOC/WBE owned businesses at rates disproportionate to their respective share of the population.


Providing additional capacity to oversee and manage the administrative operation of the department ensures that these division are supported as effectively as possible to provide those services to residents and community. It allows for division support staff to focus their work on the mission itself and provide the highest level of service to residents file complaints, inquiries about specifics of a program, or managing review panels and alternate dispute resolution processes.


Traditionally, Civil Rights has had a decentralized administrative operations process. Over the past few years, changes have been implemented to house the truly administrative processes such as budget, staffing, facilities, strategic planning/workforce development, data analytics, and others under a single group. The result has been an increase in consistency of work product and a reduction in the need to pull staff from divisions for various support needs. However, as the department has continued to grow, so has the need for operational staff support to ensure that process improvements can continue. This position is intended to serve as one of the key contributors to this next step and allow divisions to focus the vast majority of their resources on enforcement work while also provide an increase in the level of service provided to the day to day operations of the department itself.


Equity impacts and results

The enforcement divisions of Civil Rights oversee areas including allegations of discrimination, labor standards violations, police misconduct, and equitable and inclusive contracting with the City. The common link between each division is that the work is intended to provide a recourse to discriminatory, unjust, or inequitable actions. Data also indicates that these actions continue to impact people of color, LBGTQA/I, and BIPOC/WBE owned businesses at rates disproportionate to their respective share of the population.


Providing additional capacity to oversee and manage the administrative operation of the department ensures that these division are supported as effectively as possible to provide those services to residents and community. It allows for division support staff to focus their work on the mission itself and provide the highest level of service to residents file complaints, inquiries about specifics of a program, or managing review panels and alternate dispute resolution processes.


Traditionally, Civil Rights has had a decentralized administrative operations process. Over the past few years, changes have been implemented to house the truly administrative processes such as budget, staffing, facilities, strategic planning/workforce development, data analytics, and others under a single group. The result has been an increase in consistency of work product and a reduction in the need to pull staff from divisions for various support needs. However, as the department has continued to grow, so has the need for operational staff support to ensure that process improvements can continue. This position is intended to serve as one of the key contributors to this next step and allow divisions to focus the vast majority of their resources on enforcement work while also provide an increase in the level of service provided to the day to day operations of the department itself.

Civil Rights - Body Worn Camera Analyst

Program: Office of Police Conduct Review

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 1.0


Proposal detail and background

The Council approves the creation of 1.0 FTE and $107,000 in ongoing funding for a Body Worn Camera Analyst.


The Office of Police Conduct Review (OPCR) ensures police conduct complaints are processed fairly in order to foster mutual respect between the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD) and all populations of the City of Minneapolis. These efforts are a cornerstone of Mayoral efforts to increase police-community relations and ensure the effective operations of the City’s civilian oversight mechanism.


MPD reports show that since March 2018, the number of BWC opportunities that have video for all has risen from around 60% to over 90%. This increase has meant that in the event police conduct complaints are filed, the likelihood of available body-worn camera footage to review has risen as well.


Description of the change

This position is intended to be complementary to the existing 3.0 FTE Body Camera Analysts within OPCR.


Body camera usage by the police officers to whom they have been issued has increased to 94%. Recent emphasis on body camera usage has resulted in a corresponding increase in the quantity of case related video. The result has resulted in an increase in the work needed to review this video when a complaint is filed.


Current body camera analyst averages (1 on staff):


  • Locating the correct case: 0-30 minutes
  • Downloading the video: 1-6 hours
  • Watching the videos: 1-8 hours
  • Categorizing and summarizing the videos: 30 minutes – 1 hour

OPCR has already implemented a standardized review process and this FTE would be incorporated in that to ensure that all relevant video can be reviewed and categorized correctly for investigators. The effective and efficient operation of body camera review by OPCR has a direct impact on mechanism of police oversight in the City of Minneapolis.


Equity impacts and results

Cases of police misconduct continue to increase with OPCR seeing more cases filed in 2019 than in previous years. Acts of police misconduct disproportionately impact people of color, people who identify as LGBTQA/ I, and those people with mental health issues or are in a time of crisis.


Approximately 60% of cases occurred in just two Precincts, 1 and 4. 30% occurred in the 4th Precinct alone. Complainants identifying as Black filed more complaints about use of force than all other demographics combined. Further, complainants identifying as people of color requested civilian complaint investigators at nearly 3x the rate of police investigators. There are currently 3x more police investigators that civilian investigators.


With OPCR’s body camera analysts being tasked with handling both an increase in cases and an increase in available video, there is a risk of delays in information being processed to the assigned case investigators. Therefore, it is of utmost importance our investigators are able to continue to give the best services possible to further the efforts of the City in growing relationships and sustaining government transparency.


The work of OPCR is critical in addressing the Results goals of Protecting Rights and Promoting Justice and Meeting Customer and Community Needs. OPCR Case Investigators are the individuals responsible for working with complainants and MPD to provide an independent review of information and ensure that Minneapolis officers who are found to have engaged in misconduct are held accountable.


To accurately measure performance, OPCR tracks the volume of body camera footage reviewed and the time needed for this task. OPCR joint supervisors have made it a focus to lower the average time an investigation is open and this data is being tracked for comparison to the previous two years. As the volume of cases filed increases, having additional resources to ensure effective turnaround times will be important in achieving the high standards set for this division.

Civil Rights - Collaborative Enforcement

Program: Labor Standards Enforcement Division

Fund: General Fund

FTE: 0.0


Proposal detail and background

The Council approves $113,630 ongoing funding and $186,370 one-time funding for collaborative enforcement of the City’s Sick and Safe Time, Municipal Minimum Wage, Wage Theft and Freelance Worker Protection Ordinances in the Labor Standards Enforcement Division (LSED) of Civil Rights.


Description of the change

There is currently significant noncompliance with labor laws in particular industries that the City cannot access effectively without the help of trusted community partners. In short, the City’s complaint-based enforcement of its new labor standards (minimum wage, sick and safe time, wage theft, and freelance worker protection ordinances) cannot function well when the most vulnerable and more often exploited workers are also the least likely to file complaints. However, there is an effective solution to this problem. Community-based workers centers are much better positioned (embedded within community) than any government actors, including the City, to build trust and communication with undocumented and other immigrant or marginalized communities of low-wage workers and workers of color.


Our success - compliance with City labor standards across the city – relies, in large part, on our ability to connect with these communities of workers. Otherwise, the labor market leaves them much more vulnerable to exploitation than white workers by less scrupulous employers. Similarly, failures of the labor market to regulate the behavior of less scrupulous employers places law-abiding employers at a competitive disadvantage and, as a result, slowly erodes wages for all workers.


Collaborative enforcement is a nationally recognized best practice wherein community-based organizations with relationships and credibility carefully cultivated within particular industries, languages, and communities of marginalized low-wage workers of color are funded to function as a trainer, organizer, and liaison between the City and the most vulnerable workers (upon whom our enforcement relies). In comparison, complaints filed directly with the City and without the assistance of community-based workers centers have been predominantly initiated by white employees and/or union members. The contracted community-based non-profit receives funding to conduct outreach and education with the goals of increasing awareness of labor law and rights amongst low wage workers, referring violations to the City for enforcement, and identifying potential low-wage worker leaders for deeper trainings and ambassador development.


To date, the assistance of Centro de Trabajadores Unidos en la Lucha, Restaurant Opportunity Center, Awood, Comunidades Organizando el Poder y la Acción Latina and other community based workers centers has significantly increased aware of city labor standards and other workers’ rights amongst workers in vulnerable industries such as restaurants and food service. As a result, enforcement by workers themselves has significantly increased compliance in these industries. City investment in collaborative enforcement has empowered workers, especially immigrant and workers of color, to resolve issues themselves and without need to expend scarce City enforcement resources. Indeed, complaints filed by workers in the restaurant industry (as a proportion of all cases filed with LSED) have been cut in half since first funding a collaborative enforcement program.


Collaborative enforcement utilizes the expertise and resources and experience of the individuals most immediately impacted by City labor standards to help ensure that the promised benefits of public policy reach those intended. Importantly, as a result, all workers and their wages are better protected in the long term. Inclusive economic growth requires engagement and empowerment of the most easily interchangeable workers in the economy. The City’s labor standards, and especially collaborative enforcement of them, move us in that direction.


Equity impacts and results

The adoption of the labor standards ordinances were explicit strategies to address economic disparities across the City and invest in people. Much of the data is readily available and has been reported extensively; 41% of all black workers and 54% of all Latino workers were paid less than $15 per hour (at the time of ordinance passage), compared to only 17% of white workers in Minneapolis. Similar disparities exist in rates of access to sick and safe time and wage theft prevention. For example, 63% of white workers in Minneapolis previously had access to earned sick and safe time, compared with only 32% of Latino workers. These disparities in access to sick and safe time have been especially devastating and apparent during the current public health crisis. In contrast, when executed properly, community members themselves are empowered through collaborative enforcement of labor standards.


A rising minimum wage and enforcement of City labor standards intends to attack race and income disparities across the city, by empowering lower wage-earning communities of workers and the businesses at which they choose to spend and reinvest their earnings. Similar to significant City funding of small business supports and technical assistance, collaborative enforcement and support of vulnerable workers ensures that economic growth on historically (economically) neglected corridors like Lake Street and Broadway include current residents and the workers who already live and shop here.

Civil Rights

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